Tag Archive FinFET

ByAdele Hars

EuroSOI-ULIS (April 2019, Grenoble) + Free FD-SOI RF Technology Workshop for 5G

If you’ve never been, you should put it on your list. EuroSOI is one of those seminal conferences where you get a front-row seat to emerging technologies. It provides an interactive forum for scientists and engineers working in the field of new materials and advanced nanoscale devices. In fact, some of the leading technologies enabled by SOI that are now in the mainstream got their start at this conference. Within a few years of being presented here, the best work continues to evolve and star in the “big” conferences like IEDM and VLSI.

The list of luminaries on the steering and technical committees is a veritable who’s who of the SOI research ecosystem, including two winners of the IEEE Andrew Grove Award: Technical Chair Jean-Pierre Colinge and Sorin Cristoloveanu. So, if you want to get in on the ground floor of next-gen SOI, or just get a look at the early stages of the pipeline, this is a great place to do it.

One of the key objectives is to promote collaboration and partnership between players in academia, research and industry. As such it provides opportunities for cross-fertilization across materials, devices and design. The networking is excellent, and the gala dinner is always an affair to remember.

This year, papers in the following areas have been solicited:

  • Advanced SOI materials and wafers. Physical mechanisms and innovative SOI-like devices
  • New channel materials for CMOS: strained Si, strained SOI, SiGe, GeOI, III-V and high mobility materials on insulator; carbon nanotubes; graphene and other two-dimensional materials.
  • Properties of ultra-thin films and buried oxides, defects, interface quality. Thin gate dielectrics: high-κ materials for switches and memory.
  • Nanometer scale devices: technology, characterization techniques and evaluation metrics for high performance, low power, low standby power, high frequency and memory applications.
  • Alternative transistor architectures including FDSOI, DGSOI, FinFET, MuGFET, vertical MOSFET, Nanowires, FeFET and Tunnel FET, MEMS/NEMS, Beyond-CMOS nanoelectronic devices.
  • New functionalities in silicon-compatible nanostructures and innovative devices representing the More than Moore domain, nanoelectronic sensors, biosensor devices, energy harvesting devices, RF devices, imagers, etc.
  • CMOS scaling perspectives; device/circuit level performance evaluation; switches and memory scaling. Three-dimensional integration of devices and circuits, heterogeneous integration.
  • Transport phenomena, compact modeling, device simulation, front- and back-end process simulation.
  • Advanced test structures and characterization techniques, parameter extraction, reliability and variability assessment techniques for new materials and novel devices.
  • Emerging memory devices.

Accepted papers appear in the conference proceedings in the IEEE Xplore® digital library. The authors of the best papers are invited to submit a longer version for publication in a special issue of Solid-State Electronics. A best paper award will be attributed to the best paper by the SiNANO institute.

EuroSOI-ULIS kicks off a full week of activities in Grenoble. The day after the conference, Incize and Soitec are sponsoring an excellent, free workshop on FD-SOI RF technologies for 5G: materials, devices, circuits and performance. The’ve got a terrific line-up of presentations planned.

And towards the end of the week, there are other important satellite events. The 1st open IRDS International Roadmap for Devices and Systems European Conference (April 4th, 2019) is jointly organized by the USA, Japan and EU, and sponsored by the IEEE and SiNANO Institute. Then the week finishes out with the IEEE ICRC International Conference on Rebooting Computing (April 5th, 2019).

Grenoble the first week of April 2019 is clearly the place to be.

ByAdele Hars

Foundries Ramp FD-SOI, VLSI Survey Shows Why – More Highlights from the Silicon Valley SOI Symposium (Part 2)

Good news: there are far fewer bigoted extremists out there when it comes to FD-SOI vs. FinFETs. People want the best technology for their application. It’s that simple. That’s a key piece of news from the updated survey by Dan Hutcheson, CEO of VLSI Research, which he presented in the afternoon session of the SOI Consortium’s 2018 SOI Symposium in Silicon Valley

The afternoon then featured presentations by foundry partners, which I’ll cover here.

Also in the afternoon were presentations by wafer-maker Simgui, some innovative start-ups leveraging FD-SOI for custom SoCs and the final panel discussion. I’ll cover those in Part 3 of this series.

BTW, if somehow you missed my coverage of the morning sessions about very cool new products and projects from NXP, Sony, Audi, Airbus and Andes Technology, be sure to click here to read it.

The presentations are starting to be posted on the SOI Consortium Events page – but some won’t be. Either way, I’ll cover them here.

VLSI Research

A couple years ago at the annual SOI Symposium in Silicon Valley, Dan Hutcheson presented results of a survey he did (ASN covered it – you can still read about it here). At the 2018 event, he presented an update, which is now posted. You can get it here.

The FD-SOI roadmap and IP availability are no longer issues for decision makers, he found. The 14nm branch – do you go FinFET or FD-SOI? – is gone. “Fins and FD are complementary,” he observed. Most people said they’d consider using both and running two roadmaps, choosing whichever technology is appropriate to a given design.

(Courtesy: VLSI Research, SOI Consortium)

From a transistor viewpoint, the top reasons to choose FD-SOI is that it’s better for analog and has lower leakage/parastics. It’s perceived as better for complex, high mixed-signal SoCs, and especially for RF and sensor integration. In fact, people see RF as the new mixed-signal, wherein FD-SOI is uniquely positioned for 5G and mmWave.

From a business viewpoint, FD-SOI is perceived to have real advantages. In particular, FD-SOI wins when it comes to keeping down design costs, manufacturing costs and time-to-market. IoT is still the hottest target market for FD-SOI, to which he adds high growth expected in automotive and medical.

Samsung

With 20 tape-outs in 2018, Samsung is seeing an acceleration in its FD-SOI business. “The trend is healthy,” said Hong Hoa, SVP of the company’s foundry business. FD-SOI, he continued, is on a “differentiation path.”

Samsung’s 28nm FD-SOI process, called 28FDS is at full maturity with very strong yields. They’re seeing more customers and a wider range of applications. The design infrastructure, silicon-verified IP and methodologies are also all mature. They have optimal implementation and verification guidelines for body bias design, a body bias memory usage guide, and a body bias generator integration guide. The process supports Grade 1 automotive, and will be qualified for Grade 2 in a few weeks.

FD-SOI, Hoa reminded the audience, offers superior RF performance compared to both planar bulk and 14nm FinFET. The Samsung strategy is to first provide a base for for the FD-SOI process, then add RF and eMRAM. The base for 28nm was done in 2016; they added RF in 2017 and eMRAM this year.

The Samsung platform for IoT applications integrates both RF and eMRAM to support multi-function needs in a single platform. Lead customers are already working with eMRAM in their designs, he added. (BTW, Samsung has a really nice video explaining their eMRAM offering – you can see it on YouTube here.)

The basic PDK for the Samsung 18nm FD-SOI process (18FDS) will be available in September 2018, with full production slated for fall of 2019. It will deliver a 24% increase in performance, a 38% decrease in power, and a 35% decrease in area for logic. RF for the 18FDSplatform will be ready by the end of this year, and eMRAM beginning in 2019.

GlobalFoundries

With design wins from 36 customers underway, 12 of which are taping out in 22FDX (GF’s 22nm FD-SOI process) this year, the market has validated FDX for differentiation, said GF SVP Dr. Bami Bastani. And indeed, designers are using it for a wide array of applications across North America, Europe, Asia/Pacific and Japan.

Customers in the North America are designing in 22FDX for NB-IoT, industrial, RF/analog, mobile, network switches and cryptocurrency applications. In Europe, it’s more or less the same plus automotive/mmWave, optical transmission, wireless BTS and AI/ML. In Asia Pacific/Japan the mix is similar to Europe.

Bastani sees the three big enablers as the the strengths of the roadmap, the ecosystem and multi-sourcing from Dresden and Chengdu (where they’re already equipping the cleanrooms). He also tipped his hat in acknowledgment to the partnership with FD-SOI wafer supplier Soitec, noting that they have gone the extra mile to match GF’s requirements.

So that was the first part of a great afternoon.  As mentioned above, my next post (part 3) will cover a very informative presentation by wafer-maker Simgui on the markets in China, plus talks by some innovative start-ups leveraging FD-SOI for custom SoCs and the final panel discussion.

 

ByAdministrator

12nm FD-SOI on the Roadmap for H1/2019 Customer Tape-out! Says GloFo (While Giving 22FDX Ecosys a Great Boost)

gf_logo12nm FD-SOI has now officially joined the GlobalFoundries’ roadmap, targeting intelligent, connected systems and beating 14/16nm FinFET on performance, power consumption (by 50%!) and cost (see press release here). Customer product tape-outs are expected to begin in the first half of 2019. GloFo also announced FDXcelerator™, an ecosystem designed to give 22FDX™ SoC design a boost and reduce time-to-market for its customers (press release here).

gf_12fdxslide16lowres

(Courtesy: GlobalFoundries and SOI Consortium Shanghai FD-SOI Forum 2016)

The news turned heads worldwide (hundreds of publications immediately picked up the news) – and especially in China. “We are excited about the GlobalFoundries 12FDX offering and the value it can provide to customers in China,” said Dr. Xi Wang, Director General, Academician of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology.  “Extending the FD-SOI roadmap will enable customers in markets such as mobile, IoT, and automotive to leverage the power efficiency and performance benefits of the FDX technologies to create competitive products.”

Wayne Dai, CEO of VeriSilicon (headquartered in Shanghai but designing for the world’s biggest names in the chip biz), added, “We look forward to extending our collaboration with GlobalFoundries on their 12FDX offering and providing high-quality, low-power and cost-effective solutions to our customers for the China market. The unique benefits of FD-SOI technologies enable us to differentiate in the automotive, IoT, mobility, and consumer market segments.”

The ultra-thin FD-SOI wafers are where it all starts, and they’re ready to go in high volume, says Paul Boudre, CEO of SOI wafer leader Soitec. “We are very pleased to see a strong momentum and a very solid adoption from fabless customers in 22FDX offering,” he adds. “Now this new 12FDX offering will further expand FD-SOI market adoption. This is an amazing opportunity for our industry just in time to support a big wave of new mobile and connected applications.”

All About 12

GloFo’s 12FDXTM platform, which builds on the success of its 22FDXTM offering, is designed to enable the intelligent systems of tomorrow across a range of applications, from mobile computing and 5G connectivity to artificial intelligence and autonomous vehicles. Increased integration of intelligent components including wireless (RF) connectivity, non-volatile memory, and power management—all while driving ultra-low power consumption—are key 12FDX selling points that FinFETs can’t touch.

The technology also provides the industry’s widest range of dynamic voltage scaling and unmatched design flexibility via software-controlled transistors—capable of delivering peak performance when and where it is needed, while balancing static and dynamic power for the ultimate in energy efficiency.

gf_12fdxslide20lowres

(Courtesy: GlobalFoundries and SOI Consortium Shanghai FD-SOI Forum 2016)

“Some applications require the unsurpassed performance of FinFET transistors, but the vast majority of connected devices need high levels of integration and more flexibility for performance and power consumption, at costs FinFET cannot achieve,” said GLOBALFOUNDRIES CEO Sanjay Jha. “Our 22FDX and 12FDX technologies fill a gap in the industry’s roadmap by providing an alternative path for the next generation of connected intelligent systems. And with our FDX platforms, the cost of design is significantly lower, reopening the door for advanced node migration and spurring increased innovation across the ecosystem.”

Kudos came in from G. Dan Hutcheson, CEO of VLSI Research, IBS CEO Handel Jones, Linley Group Founder Linley Gwennap, Dasaradha Gude, CEO of IP/design specialists INVECAS, Leti CEO Marie Semeria and NXP VP Ron Martino (they’ve already started on 28nm FD-SOI for their i.MX line – read his superb explanations in ASN here).

22 Design Plug ‘n Play

Simultaneously to the 12FDX announcement, GloFo announced the FDXcelerator Partner Program. It creates an open framework under which selected Partners can integrate their products or services into a validated, plug and play catalog of design solutions. This level of integration allows customers to create high performance designs while minimizing development costs through access to a broad set of quality offerings, specific to 22FDX technology. The Partner ecosystem positions members and customers to take advantage of the broad adoption and accelerating growth of the FDX market.

Initial partners of the FDXcelerator Partner Program are: Synopsys (EDA), Cadence (EDA), INVECAS (IP and Design Solutions), VeriSilicon (ASIC), CEA Leti (services), Dreamchip (reference solutions) and Encore Semi (services). These companies have already initiated work to deliver advanced 22FDX SoC solutions and services.

Initial FDXcelerator Partners have committed a set of key offerings to the program, including:

  • tools (EDA) that complement industry leading design flows by adding specific modules to easily leverage FDSOI body-bias differentiated features,
  • a comprehensive library of design elements (IP), including foundation IP, interfaces and complex IP to enable foundry customers to start their designs from validated IP elements,
  • platforms (ASIC), which allow a customer to build a complete ASIC offering on 22FDX,
  • reference solutions (reference designs, system IP), whereby the Partner brings system level expertise in Emerging application areas, enabling customers to speed-up time to market,
  • resources (design consultation, services), whereby Partners have trained dedicated resources to support 22FDX technology; and
  • product packaging and test (OSAT) solutions.

Additional FDXcelerator members will be announced in the following months.

ByGianni PRATA

GF’s 12nm FD-SOI With Back Bias Beats 10nm FinFET Performance (EETimes)

With back bias,12nm FD-SOI beats 10nm FinFET on performance. This excellent news comes in by way of Peter Clarke of EETimes Europe (read the whole article here). Rutger Wijburg, GM of GloFo’s Dresden fab told him, “If you look at performance with back-bias 22FDX is the same or better than 16/14nm FinFET process. With 12FDX with back bias you get better than 10nm FinFET processes.”

By

GlobalFoundries and Synopsys Streamline the Move to 22nm FD-SOI

By: Tamer Ragheb, Digital Design Methodology Technical Manager at GlobalFoundries and Josefina Hobbs, Senior Manager of Strategic Alliances, Synopsys

It’s clear that getting an optimal balance of power and performance at the right cost is foremost in the minds of designers today. Designers who want either high performance or ultra low-power, or ideally both, have a choice to make when it comes to migrating to next generation nodes. For applications that push the envelope in performance, FinFET would be the optimal solution. For applications that require ultra low-power and more RF integration, FD-SOI is the right solution. The two technologies have different value propositions that need to be considered while designing for applications ranging from high-performance computing and server to high-end mobile and Internet of Things (IoT).

GlobalFoundries 22FDX is the industry’s very first 22nm FD-SOI platform. The 22FDX technology is specifically designed to meet the ultra low-power requirements of the next generation of connected devices. The big advantage of this platform is its ability to provide software control at the transistor level through flexible body-biasing (Fig. 1). The ability to provide real-time trade-offs between power and performance via software-controlled body-biasing of the transistor creates new options for the designer. For example, imagine designing a processor for a Smartwatch that could match its power-performance tradeoff to your typical use and modify its performance based on how you’re using it that day.

GLOBALFOUNDRIES and Synopsys Streamline the Move to 22nm FD-SOI_Fig. 1_Benefits of 22FDX body-biasing

Figure 1: Benefits of 22FDX body-biasing

The full impact of the body bias capability of 22FDX becomes clear when compared to incumbent high-performance process technologies (Fig. 2). 22FDX compared to a 28nm high K metal gate (HKMG) technology can provide up to 50% less power at the same frequency, or 40% faster performance at the same total power than 28HKMG. In addition, 22FDX can be further optimized with forward body bias, shown on the blue curve, to further reduce the power or to further boost the speed in a turbo operation mode.

GLOBALFOUNDRIES and Synopsys Streamline the Move to 22nm FD-SOI_Fig. 2_22FDX Body Bias Optimizes Performance and Power

Figure 2: 22FDX Body Bias Optimizes Performance and Power

In addition to the body bias, 22FDX offers capabilities for design flexibility and intelligent control that are not available in other technologies. These include:

  • Improved electrostatic control of the transistor acts as a performance booster and enables lower VDD (i.e., lower power consumption) while reaching significant performance
  • Low variability and body-biasing capability that can achieve 0.4 volt operation
  • Complete RF enablement with ‘knobs’ to reduce RF power by up to 50 percent

Manufacturing success is highly sensitive to specific physical design features, with advanced nodes requiring more complex design rules and more attention to manufacturability issues on the part of designers. However, there are essentially no additional manufacturing requirements to design in 22FDX beyond what is required for 28nm designs.

There are four application optimized extensions available with 22FDX (Fig. 3). These are:

  • 22FDX ULP- an ultra low-power extension that provides logic libraries and memory compilers that are optimized for 0.4 volt operation.
  • 22 FDX ULL- an ultra low-leakage extension that brings in an expanded device suite capable of achieving one pico-amp per micron leakage.
  • 22 FDX UHP- an ultra high-performance extension that leverages the overdrive capabilities and body-biasing features to maximize the performance of technologies in a turbo or a burst mode. It has high performance libraries and high speed interfaces and BEOL stacks optimized for competing architectures or applications.
  • 22 FDX RFA- an RF and analog extension that brings in full characterization and enablement for RF applications, including optimized RF layouts and P cells, BEOL passives, and IP for Bluetooth LE and WIFI applications.
GLOBALFOUNDRIES and Synopsys Streamline the Move to 22nm FD-SOI_Fig. 3_22FDX Platform and Extensions

Figure 3: 22FDX Platform and Extensions

GlobalFoundries reference flow for 22FDX has been optimized to support forward and reverse body bias (FBB/RBB), which provides the design flexibility to optimize the performance/power trade-offs. The reference flow supports implant-aware and continuous diffusion-aware placement, tap insertion and body bias network connectivity according to high voltage rules, double-patterning aware parasitic extraction (PEX), and design for manufacturing (DFM). This provides designers with the flexibility to manage power, performance and leakage targets for the next-generation chips used in mainstream mobile, IoT and networking applications.

GlobalFoundries has been collaborating with Synopsys to enable and qualify their tools for the 22FDX Reference Flow. The recent qualification of Synopsys’ Galaxy™ Design Platform for the current version ofGlobalFoundries’ 22FDX technology allows the designer to manage power, performance and leakage and achieve optimal energy efficiency and cost effectiveness. Synopsys’ Galaxy Design Platform supports body biasing techniques throughout the design flow, including both forward and reverse body bias, enabling power/performance trade-offs to be made dynamically and delivering up to 50% power reduction.

Key tools and features of the Galaxy Design Platform in the 22FDX reference flow include:

  • Design Compiler® Graphical synthesis with IEEE 1801 (UPF) driven bias-aware multi-corner multi-mode (MCMM) optimization
  • Formality® formal verification with bias-aware equivalence checking
  • IC Compiler™ and IC Compiler II™ layout with physical implementation support for non-uniform library floorplanning, implant-aware placement, multi-rail routing, and advanced power mesh creation
  • StarRC™  parasitic extraction for multi-rail signoff with support for multi-valued standard parasitic exchange format (SPEF)
  • PrimeTime® timing analysis and signoff including distributed multi-scenario analysis (DMSA) static timing and noise analysis, using AOCV and POCV technology
  • IC Validator In-Design physical verification

The 22FDX technology leverages existing design tools such as the Galaxy Design Platform, manufacturing infrastructure and the broader design ecosystem. This speeds time to market and enables the creation of differentiated products.

ByAdministrator

The Ever-Expanding 28nm FD-SOI Ecosystem (Samsung Interview, Part 3 of 3)

(New)Kelvin Low Portrait 2015

Kelvin Low, senior director of marketing for Samsung Foundry

Axel_Fischer_Samsung_28FDSOI_sm

Axel Fischer, director of Samsung System LSI business in Europe

For this 3-part series, ASN spoke with Kelvin Low, senior director of marketing for Samsung Foundry and Axel Fischer, director of Samsung System LSI business in Europe about the company’s FD-SOI offering. Here in part 3, we’ll talk about the ecosystem. (In part 1 we talked about technology readiness, and in part 2, we talked about design.)

~ ~ ~

ASN: Let’s talk a little more about IP availability.

Axel Fischer: The availability of IP is key for engaging these market segments. The technology itself is ready. The gating item often is the IP element.

Kelvin Low: The IP element is broadly ready. But we’re not stopping there. We’re enhancing the IP and adding on new suppliers. Most of them we can’t name yet just because of timing. But we can confidently say that multiple new IP suppliers are coming online, and many more have started to inquire about how they can get onboard.Samsung_28FDSOI_IP_reuse_14

ASN: In terms of the ecosystem, what remains to be done?

KL: The ecosystem can never end. Enhancements will always be welcome. More support – there are so many other EDA software companies out there available. We will enable them if there is a customer behind them. IP are dictated by the standards. As long as the product requires that, we’ll continue to look for partners to develop the IP.

AF: Especially as you have good support for RF/analog functionality. So, this ecosystem becomes quite important.Samsung_28FDSOI_enablement_11

KL: Back to one of the strategic decisions we made. We have immediately made available what ST Micro has in terms of IP portfolio to our customers. Then continuously build this ecosystem according to the new customers that we’re acquiring. ST Micro has developed these IPs for their own internal products, and they were gracious enough to allow these IPs to be opened up to be used by all customers without restriction.

As a group, as an ecosystem, we have to be more proactive in educating the market. What we’ve seen so far, whether it’s an initiative by Leti or an initiative by the SOI Consortium, these are very helpful. Now you have so many more knobs that you can play with, for designers we have to prepare all these PVT – which is process, voltage, temperature, and timing points so they can actually use it. It’s just a matter of preparation needed from our end, working with the ecosystem. The EDA tools must be optimized to make it as seamless, as transparent as possible.

ASN: Any closing thoughts?

KL: 28FDSOI is real. Samsung is committed. The technology is qualified already. The ecosystem is ready and expanding. This is working stuff. It’s not a powerpoint technology.

Samsung_28FDSOI_future_15~ ~ ~

This is the last installment in ASN’s 3-part interview with Samsung on their 28nm FD-SOI foundry offering. If you missed the other parts, you can still read part 1 about technology readiness (click here), and part 2 on design considerations (click here).

ByAdministrator

When to Choose 28nm FD-SOI and Why (Samsung Interview Part 2 of 3)

(New)Kelvin Low Portrait 2015

Kelvin Low, senior director of marketing for Samsung Foundry

Axel_Fischer_Samsung_28FDSOI_sm

Axel Fischer, director of Samsung System LSI business in Europe

For this 3-part series, ASN spoke with Kelvin Low, senior director of marketing for Samsung Foundry and Axel Fischer, director of Samsung System LSI business in Europe about the company’s FD-SOI offering. Here in part 2, we’ll talk about design. (In part 1, we talked about Samsung’s technology readiness. In part 3, we’ll talk about the ecosystem.)

~ ~ ~

ASN: Let’s start by talking about value. What do you see as the key advantages of 28nm FD-SOI?

Kelvin Low: FD-SOI is wide-ranging. What I mean by this is for the designers, there are many design knobs available that you can use to achieve either high performance or ultra low power. That’s a an extremely valuable and important proposition. The wide dynamic performance-power range is achieved with FD-SOI’s body biasing ability. Though bulk technologies allow body biasing, it has a comparatively much narrower range.

Samsung_28FDSOI_lowpower_knobs_13Another key benefit is the super analog gain and properties of FD-SOI. I think moving forward, we’ll probably start to see more customers that are analog-centric. Later on, we’ll see this as one of the key value propositions of FD-SOI. Today, there’s still a lot of digital customers that we’re engaged with right now. The analog customers are still not yet aggressively migrating to [[more advanced]] technology nodes, but when they come, this will be an important distinction in FD-SOI vs. bulk.

Another important distinction not related to power-performance-area is the robustness of the reliability. This is a well-proven fact that FD-SOI is much more robust for soft-error immunity as compare to bulk. So anything that needs radiation protection (for example, military, aerospace – but those are not really the high-volumes), as well as automotive products, you’ll see value of better SER immunity as compared to bulk. Not just memory SER but logic SER. There are available design techniques to overcome / account for that. For example, if you design to overcome SER, you incur overhead in area for example. With FD-SOI, this is intrinsic, so you don’t need design tricks to suppress it.

ASN: When should designers consider using 28nm FD-SOI as opposed moving to 14nm FinFET or choosing another 28nm technology?

KL: By virtue of one being 28 and the other being 14, if you do need a lot of logic feature integration, or die-size reduction, 14nm will obviously become more necessary. If you just are looking for power savings, both 14nm FinFET and 28nm FD-SOI are fully depleted in nature, so both are able to operate with a lower power supply. So those are similarities. 14nm FinFET does provide higher performance compared to 28nm by virtue of how the process is constructed. Lastly, cost, which is related to the number of double-patterning layers – at 28nm, avoiding all the expensive double-patterning layers and 14nm having double-patterning being necessary for all the area scaling – that presents itself as a real difference. The end-product cost can also determine the choice of the technology selection.

Samsung_28FDSOI_Vdd_9Axel Fischer: The end-product cost, plus as well the investments from the customer side: the customer has to make a certain investment to develop the chip in terms of overall cost. If you look at photomask payment, NRE* and so on – this is weighting strongly, more and more as you go forward with advanced node technologies. There’s a set of customers that are feeling very comfortable to stay on the 28nm node.

KL: There are several 28nm flavors. There’s Poly-SiON, there’s HKMG, and there’s HKMG-FD-SOI. In terms of performance, there’s really a very clear distinction. In terms of power, you see a more radical power reduction with FD-SOI. In chip area scaling, I’d say roughly the same between HKMG and FD-SOI. This is dictated not so much by the transistor but by the overall design rules of the technology. So, 14nm is the higher cost point. 28nm is a much lower cost point, so overall a given budget that a customer has can determine whether 14nm is usable or otherwise. We have to sit down with the customer and really understand their needs. It’s not just trying to push one over the other solution. Based on their needs, we’ll make the proper recommendations.Samsung_28FDSOI_PPA_7

ASN: Can designers get started today?

KL: We are moving FD-SOI discussions with customers to the next phase, which is to emphasize the design ecosystem readiness. So what we’ve been working on, and we really appreciate ST Micro’s support here, is to kick-start market adoption. We have access to ST Micro’s foundation library, and some of their foundation and basic IPs. Here, Samsung is distributing and supporting customers directly. They need to only work with us, and not with ST Micro. So they have access to the IP through us. We also provide design support, and we have additional IPs coming in to serve the customers from the traditional IP providers.

Many designers are new to body biasing. Fortunately, there are a couple of design partners that can help in this area. Synapse being one of them; Verisilicon another. Already, they have put in resources and plans and additional solutions to catalyze this market. In short, the PDK is available today, and the PDK supporting multi tools – Synopsys, Cadence and Mentor – are all available for download today. Libraries are also all available for download.

There’s nothing impeding designers from starting projects now. This is why we believe that 28FDSOI is the right node, because we are enabling the market to start projects today. If we start something else down the road, like a 14nm FD-SOI, for example, or something in between, the market will just say, hey, we like your transistor, we like your slides, but I have nothing to start my project on. So that is bad, because then it becomes a vicious cycle. We believe we have to enable 28nm designs now. Enable customers to bring actual products to the market. Eventually from there you can evolve 28 to something else.

ASN: Let’s talk some more about design considerations and body biasing, how it’s used and when.

KL: Both 14nm FinFET and 28nm FD-SOI are fully depleted. One unique technology value of fully-depleted architecture is the ability to operate the device at lower power supply. So power is the product of CV²/frequency. If you can operate this chip at lower power supply, you get significant dynamic power savings. FinFET does not have a body effect, so you cannot implement body biasing – it’s just not possible.

Samsung_28FDSOI_bodybias_8FD-SOI, on the other hand, has this extra knob – body biasing – that you can use. With reverse body bias (RBB), you can get much lower leakage power. If you want more performance, you can activate the FBB to get the necessary speed. Again, this is not possible with FinFET. So that will be one distinction. It depends on how you’re using your chip. It all depends on the system side, or even at the architecture side, how is it being considered already. If you’re already very comfortable using body biasing, then going to FinFET is a problem, because you’ve lost a knob. Some would rather not lose this knob because they see it as a huge advantage. That doesn’t mean you can’t design around it, it’s just different.

There are already users of body biasing for bulk. For customers that already use body biasing, this is nothing new. They’re pleased to now have the wider range, as opposed to the more narrow range for bulk.

AF: And probably going to FinFET is more disruptive for them. With FinFET, you have double-patterning considerations, etc. More capacitance to deal with.

ASN: Porting – does FD-SOI change the amount of time you have to budget for your port?

KL: If a customer already has products at 28nm, and they’re now planning the next product that has higher speed or better power consumption – they’re considering FinFET as one option, and now maybe the other option available is 28nm FD-SOI. The design learnings of going to FinFET are much more. So the port time will be longer than going to 28nm FD-SOI. We see customers hugely attracted because of this fact. Now they’re trying to make a choice. If it’s just a time-to-market constraint, sometimes FinFET doesn’t allow you to achieve that. If you have to tape out production in six months, you may have to use FD-SOI.

Samsung_28FDSOI_apps_6AF: Another key point for customers deciding to work with 28FDSOI is the fact that Samsung Foundry has joined the club. A few customers really hesitated on making the move to 28nm FD-SOI ST Micro is a very really advanced company, doing its own research and development, but the fact that the production capability was very limited has people shying away. Besides the technology, the presence and the engagement of Samsung is giving another boost to the acceptance.

KL: Yes, we’re recognized as a credible, high-volume manufacturing partner. That helps a lot.

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*NRE = non-recurring engineering. In a fabless scenario, there are NRE for IP and design (engineering costs, up-front and royalty-based IP costs), NRE for masks and fabrication (mask costs, wafer prototype lots, tools costs, probe cards, loadboards and other one-time capital expenditures), and NRE for qualifications (ESD, latch-up and other industry-specific qualifications, as in automotives).

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This is the second installment in ASN’s 3-part interview with Samsung on their 28nm FD-SOI foundry offering. If you missed the other parts, you can still read part 1 about technology readiness (click here), and part 3 on the ecosystem (click here).

ByAdministrator

Yes, 28nm FD-SOI Silicon Is Running (Samsung Interview, Part 1 of 3)

(New)Kelvin Low Portrait 2015

Kelvin Low, senior director of marketing for Samsung Foundry

Axel_Fischer_Samsung_28FDSOI_sm

Axel Fischer, director of Samsung System LSI business in Europe

ASN spoke with Kelvin Low, senior director of marketing for Samsung Foundry and Axel Fischer, director of Samsung System LSI business in Europe about the company’s FD-SOI offering. Here in part 1, we’ll talk about technology readiness. In parts 2 and 3, we’ll talk about design and the ecosystem.

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ASN: Where does Samsung stand in terms of rolling out your 28nm FD-SOI offer?

Kelvin Low: We have completed key milestones. Wafer level qualification was completed in September 2014, and then product level qualification in March 2015. So, the good news is the technology is fully qualified now.

What we have additionally in terms of overall technology readiness is production PDKs available right now. We have run a couple of MPWs already, and we’re scheduling more for next year. Silicon is really running in our fab. I think many may not have grasped that fact. Silicon is running, and we are running production for ST as one of our lead customers.

Samsung_28FDSOI_PDKS_12Axel Fischer: We already have a long relationship with ST – since 32 and 28nm HKMG bulk. We had a press release where we stated that more than a dozen projects had been taped out. EETimes published an article at the time. Adding 28 FD-SOI was a natural extension of an existing relationship

KL: That’s right –This is not a new customer scenario – it’s an existing customer, but an expansion of technology. And, in this case, it’s also a collaboration technology and IP solutions.

We are ST Micro’s primary manufacturing partner; this is one reason that it’s mutually beneficial for both of us. Crolles is not aiming for high volume. They prototype well. They do MPW and IP well, but they are not a high-volume fab. So, we complete the production rollout at Samsung Foundry.

ASN: Do you have other customers lined up?

KL: The short answer is yes. Beyond ST, Freescale can we talk about, since they have openly stated that they are using FD-SOI with us. Other customers, unfortunately, we just can’t say.But, they are in all the market segments (especially IoT) where the cost and ultra-low power combination is a very powerful one.

ASN: What about technology readiness and maturity?

KL: We have a couple of different 28 variants: the LPP, the LPH with more than a million wafers shipped. And because of that, our D0 – defect density – is at a very mature level. 28FD-SOI, sharing almost 75% of the process modules of 28 bulk, allows us to go to a very steep D0 reduction curve. We are essentially leveraging what we already know from the 28 bulk production experience. Defect density is essentially the inverse of yield. So, the lower the D0, the higher the yield.

Samsung_28FDSOI_process_costThis slide [[see above]] show the similarities between our FD-SOI and our 28 HKMG bulk. You can see how more than 75% of bulk modules are reused. The BEOL is identical, so its 100% reused. On the FEOL, some areas require some minor tuning and some minor modification, but anything that is specific to FD-SOI is less than 5% that we have to update from the fab perspective. All the equipment can be reused in the fab. There may be a couple of pieces related to the FD-SOI process that need to be introduced.Other than that, the equipment is being reused and can depreciated,.which is essential for any business. We leverage another lifetime for the tools.

ASN: When will we see the first high-volume FD-SOI chips? Next year?

KL: It depends on what market segment. Consumer, yes, I fully agree, they can ramp very fast. But other segments like infrastructure, networking or automotive, they’ll take a longer time to just qualify products.

AF: It’s not just us. If our customer needs to prove that the product is compliant with certain standards, you have to go through test labs and so on, this can be a very lengthy process. Product can actually be ready, and we’re all waiting to produce, but they’re still waiting for reports and the software that’s goes on top – this can be a very long cycle.

KL: We’re already starting to support the production ramp for ST. They’ll be on the market very soon.

[[Editor’s note: ST has announced three set-top box chips on 28nm FD-SOI– you can read about them here.]]

Samsung_28FDSOI_wafersAF: ST is our first partner for high-volume production. We started working together very early, so they have a time-to-market advantage.

KL: Everyone’s waiting for ChipWorks or TechInsights to cut away an end-product device that has FD-SOI. It’s just a matter of time.

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This is the first installment in ASN’s 3-part interview with Samsung on their 28nm FD-SOI foundry offering. Part 2 will cover design considerations, and Part 3 will look at the ecosystem.

ByAdministrator

GF’s 22nm FD-SOI Offering – Where to Get Lots of Excellent Info

A fast-growing body of information is now posted by GlobalFoundries on their new 22nm FD-SOI offering.

After years of asking “where’s FD-SOI on the GF website??”, it’s (finally!) there, front and center. There are some excellent new videos and documents. Here’s a rundown of what you’ll find.

GFwebsiteFDXintro

The 22FDX Platform introduction is the currently the lead topic on the GlobalFoundries website.

When you click down the “Technology Solutions” tab and select “Leading Edge Technologies”, here’s how they describe their 22nm FD-SOI offering:

GLOBALFOUNDRIES 22FDX™ platform employs 22nm Fully-Depleted Silicon-On-Insulator (FD-SOI) technology that delivers FinFET-like performance and energy-efficiency at a cost comparable to 28nm planar technologies. While some applications require the ultimate performance of three-dimensional FinFET transistors, most wireless devices need a better balance of performance, power consumption and cost. 22FDX provides the best path for cost-sensitive applications. The 22FDX platform delivers a 20 percent smaller die size and 10 percent fewer masks than 28nm, as well as nearly 50 percent fewer immersion lithography layers than foundry FinFET.

  • Ultra-low power consumption with 0.4V operation
  • Software-controlled transistor body-biasing for flexible trade-off between performance and power
  • Integrated RF for reduced system cost and back-gate feature to reduce RF power up to ~50%
  • 70% lower power than 28HKMG

Here are some of the resources posted on the website as of this writing:

Product Brief: 22FDX™ – a two-page pdf summarizing the platform advantages, the various application-optimized offerings, and basic graphics explaining how body-biasing works and what advantages it provides

FD-SOI Technology Innovations Extend Moore’s Law (white paper) – NEW! Just posted in September 2015, this 8-page white paper covers the basics of the FD-SOI transistor, how body biasing works, the impact the technology has on common circuit blocks (digital, analog & RF, embedded SRAM), and the outlook for future scaling (which goes down to 10nm).

15-GFwebinarSept28_FDX_ULPSOCex

This slide is about 17 minutes into GF’s “How to build ULP chips with 22nm FD-SOI…” webinar.

Webinar: How to Build Ultra Low Power Chips with New 22nm FD-SOI TechnologyNEW! Just posted on September 24, 2015. GF’s Jamie Schaeffer, Ph.D. Leading Edge Product Line Manager is talking to designers here. After a brief overview (he looks at the features, the extensions, the IP suite, and so forth), he gets into the fundamentals of body biasing, the different transistor optimizations, specific advantages for RF & analog, the tools for ultra-low-power design, and what’s in the design starter kits that are available today. Total running time is just under 20 minutes.

GFwebsiteFDXJulyWebinarPPcost

This slide is shown about 12 minutes into GF’s “Extending Moore’s Law with FD-SOI” webinar.

Webinar: Extending Moore’s Law with FD-SOI Technology – this is the webinar Jamie Schaeffer gave with ChipEstimate.com the day of the company’s FD-SOI announcement in July 2015. It’s a fairly high level presentation: very useful for designers, but also accessible to those outside the design community. There’s a lot of background on FinFET vs. FD-SOI, cost comparisons, target apps, and actual results seen in silicon. It’s an especially good place to start if FD-SOI is new to you. It runs just over 35 minutes.

Tech Video: Benefits of FD-SOI Technologies – in this short video by Subi Kengeri, GF’s VP of the CMOS Platforms BU, he gives a quick rundown of the benefits of FD-SOI. It runs about 2 minutes.

Another excellent place to get more indepth info on FD-SOI is an interview with Subi Kengeri by SemiEngineering Editor-in-Chief Ed Sperling (click here to see it on YouTube). This video, entitled Tech Talk: 22nm FD-SOI, was made just after the July announcement. Subi really goes into substantial detail, and clearly explains the key differences between FinFETs and FD-SOI. He explains why FD-SOI has less variability than FinFETs, why FinFETs have higher device capacitance, and how only with FD-SOI can you dynamically change Vt. FD-SOI also comes out better in terms of dynamic power, thermal budget and RF integration. Highly recommended – it runs just over 20 minutes.

You might also want to check out GF CEO Sanjay Jha’s Shanghai FD-SOI Forum presentation, The Right Technology at the Right Time, on the SOI Consortium website. (There are lots of others there, too!) Taking a bird’s eye view of the semiconductor industry drivers and requirements, he concludes, “22FDX and RFSOI have the power, performance, and cost to drive growth in mobile, pervasive, and intelligent computing.”

Which is great news for the SOI ecosystem and the entire industry.

ByFanny Rodriguez

Great line-up planned for IEEE S3S (SOI, 3D and low-voltage — 5-8 October, Sonoma, CA). Advance Program available. Registration still open.

S3Sadvprgmpic_lowres

Now in its third year, the 2015 IEEE S3S Conference has evolved into the premier venue for sharing the latest and most important findings in the areas of process integration, advanced materials & materials processing, and device and circuit design for SOI, 3D and low-voltage microelectronics. World-class leading experts in their fields will come to this year’s S3S Conference to present, discuss and debate the most recent breakthroughs in their research.

This year’s program includes:

S3S15lineup

The conference also features several events tailored for socialization and peer-to-peer discussions, such as the welcome reception, the cookout and the interactive Poster & Reception Session which is a great place to meet new colleagues and learn and exchange insights on technical topics. Enjoy a light snack and a beverage of your choice while meandering around to meet and discuss technical issues with long-time colleagues and make connections with new and influential experts and decision makers in your field.

Take time to visit the local attractions of Sonoma County. Sonoma is well known for outdoor recreation, spas, golf, night life, shopping, culinary activities, arts and music and wineries. It is truly my pleasure to serve as the General Chair of the 2015 Conference. —Bruce Doris

Download the Advance Program

Find all the details about the conference on our website: s3sconference

Click here to go directly to the IEEE S3S Conference registration page.

Click here for hotel information. To be sure of getting a room at the special conference rate book before 18 September 2015.

S3S Conference

The DoubleTree by Hilton Sonoma Wine Country, One Doubletree Drive, Rohnert Park, CA 94928

October 5th thru 8th, 2015

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LIgroupS3SJoin the IEEE S3S Conference group on LinkedIn to follow the news — click here or search on LinkedIn for IEEE S3S.