Tag Archive IEDM

World 1st and It’s on 28nm FD-SOI: ST Sampling ePCM (eNVM) for Automotive MCUs

STMicroelectronics is now sampling 28nm FD-SOI microcontrollers (MCUs) with embedded non-volatile memory (eNVM) based on ePCM to alpha customers. Field trials meeting the requirements of automotive applications and full technology qualification are expected in 2020. These MCUs—the world’s first to use ePCM, which stands for embedded Phase-Change Memory—will target powertrain systems, advanced and secure gateways, safety/ADAS applications, and Vehicle Electrification. (Read the full press release here.)

A cross section of the embedded-PCM bitcell integrated in the 28nm FD-SOI technology shows the heater that quickly flips storage cells between crystalline and amorphous states. (Courtesy: STMicroelectronics)

“Having applied ST’s process, design, technology, and application expertise to ePCM, we’ve developed an innovative recipe that makes ST the very first to combine this non-volatile memory with 28nm FD-SOI for high-performance, low-power automotive microcontrollers,” said Marco Monti, President Automotive and Discrete Group, STMicroelectronics. “With samples already in some lead-customers’ hands, we’re confirming the outstanding temperature performance of ePCM and its ability to meet all automotive standards, further assuring our confidence in its market adoption and success.”

ePCM presents a solution to chip- and system-level challenges, meeting automotive MCU requirements for AEC-Q100 Grade 0, operating at temperature up to +165°C. In addition, ST says its technology assures firmware/data retention through high-temperature soldering reflow processes and immunity to radiation, for additional data safety.

Architecture and performance benchmark updates were presented the most recent IEDM (December 2018 in San Francisco) in a paper entitled Truly Innovative 28nm FDSOI Technology for Automotive Micro-Controller Applications embedding 16MB Phase Change Memory (F. Arnaud et al). As of this writing, the IEDM 2018 papers are not yet posted on the IEEE Xplore Digital Library site. However, the ppt that ST presented at the conference is available here.

For more in-depth information on ePCM, see the ST PCM page. To learn more about how it compares with competing technologies such as eMRAM, read Embedded Phase-Change Memory Emerges by Mark Lapedus of SemiEngineering. Papers describing other eNVM solutions on FD-SOI were also presented at IEDM 2018. Samsung’s is entitled Demonstration of Highly Manufacturable STT-MRAM Embedded in 28nm Logic (Y. J. Song et al). GlobalFoundries’ is entitled 22-nm FD-SOI Embedded MRAM Technology for Low-Power Automotive-Grade-1 MCU Applications (K. Lee et al).

Leti’s M3D, now dubbed “CoolCube”, featured in EETimes

Leti's M3D technology is now called "CoolCube". (Courtesy: Leti, IEDM 2014)

Leti’s M3D technology is now called “CoolCube”. (Courtesy: Leti, IEDM 2014)

Leti’s monolithic 3D technology, which has now been dubbed “CoolCube”, was featured in a recent EETimes piece.  Entitled True 3D monolithic integration eliminates TSV dependence (click here to read it), the article covers a Leti paper presented during a 3D-VLSI workshop preceding IEDM ’14.  Leti’s Advanced CMOS lab manager Maud Vinet detailed the “cool” process in an FPGA, stacking a 14nm FD-SOI logic layer on top of a memory layer. It eliminates the need for TSVs, shrinks area by 55%, cut power in half and increases speed by 30%, effectively gaining a full node in terms of power and performance.

SOI for MEMS, NEMS, sensors and more at IEDM ’14 (Part 3 of 3 in ASN’s IEDM coverage)

iedm_logoImportant SOI-based developments in MEMS, NEMS (like MEMS but N for nano), sensors and energy harvesting shared the spotlight with advanced CMOS and future devices at IEDM 2014 (15-17 December in San Francisco). IEDM is the world’s showcase for the most important applied research breakthroughs in transistors and electronics technology.

Here in Part 3, we’ll cover these remaining areas. (In Part 1 of ASN’s IEDM coverage, we had a rundown of the top papers on FD-SOI and SOI-FinFETs. Part 2 looked at papers covering future device architectures leveraging SOI.)

Summaries culled from the abstracts follow.

Sensors

4.2: Three-Dimensional Integrated CMOS Image Sensors with Pixel-Parallel A/D Converters Fabricated by Direct Bonding of SOI Layers

M. Gotoet al (NHK Research Labs, U Tokyo)

This illustration (a) shows a schematic diagram of the 3D integrated CMOS image sensor; (b) shows a conceptual diagram of the image sensor pixel; (c) is a cross-sectional scanning electron microscope image of a bonded CMOS image sensor pixel with no voids observed at the bonded interface and with the upper layer thinned to 6.5 µm; and (d) is a photograph of the bonded CMOS image sensor array, where 60-µm-square photodiodes (PD) are stacked on inverters.(NHK paper 4.2 at IEDM '14)

This illustration (a) shows a schematic diagram of the 3D integrated CMOS image sensor; (b) shows a conceptual diagram of the image sensor pixel; (c) is a cross-sectional scanning electron microscope image of a bonded CMOS image sensor pixel with no voids observed at the bonded interface and with the upper layer thinned to 6.5 µm; and (d) is a photograph of the bonded CMOS image sensor array, where 60-µm-square photodiodes (PD) are stacked on inverters.(NHK paper 4.2 at IEDM ’14)

The resolutions and frame rates of CMOS image sensors have increased greatly to meet demands for higher-definition video systems, but their design may soon be obsolete. That’s because photodetectors and signal processors lie in the same plane, on the substrate, and many pixels must time-share a signal processor. That makes it difficult to improve signal processing speed. NHK researchers developed a 3D parallel-processing architecture they call “pixel-parallel” processing, where each pixel has its own signal processor. Photodetectors and signal processors are built in different vertically stacked layers. The signal from each pixel is vertically transferred and processed in individual stacks.

3D stacking doesn’t degrade spatial resolution, so both high resolution and a high frame rate are achieved. 3D stacked image sensors have been reported previously, but they either didn’t have a signal processor in each stack or they used TSV/microbump technology, reducing resolution. NHK discusses how photodiode and inverter layers were bonded with damascened gold electrodes to provide each pixel with analog-to-digital conversion and a pulse frequency output. A 64-pixel prototype sensor was built, which successfully captured video images and had a wide dynamic range of >80 dB, with the potential to be increased to >100dB.

 

4.5: Experimental Demonstration of a Stacked SOI Multiband Charged-Coupled Device

C.-E. Chang et al (Stanford, SLAC)

Multiband light absorption and charge extraction in a stacked SOI multiband CCD are experimentally demonstrated for the first time. This proof of concept is a key step in the realization of the technology which promises multiple-fold efficiency improvements in color imaging over current filter- and prism-based approaches.

 

15.4: A Semiconductor Bio-electrical Platform with Addressable Thermal Control for Accelerated Bioassay Development

T.-T. Chen et al (TSMC, U Illinois),

In this work, the researchres introduce a bioelectrical platform consisting of field effect transistor (FET) bio-sensors, temperature sensors, heaters, peripheral analog amplifiers and digital controllers, fabricated by a 0.18μm SOI-CMOS process technology. The bio-sensor, formed by a sub-micron FET with a high-k dielectric sensing film, exhibits near-Nernst sensitivity (56-59 mV/pH) for ionic detection. There were also 128×128 arrays tested by monitoring changes in enzyme reactions and DNA hybridization. The electrical current changes correlated to changes in pH reaching -1.387μA/pH with 0.32μA standard variation. The detection of urine level via an enzyme(urease)-catalyzed reaction has been demonstrated to a 99.9% linearity with 0.1μL sample volume. And the detection of HBV DNA was also conducted to a 400mV equivalent surface potential change between 1 μM matched and mismatched DNA. As a proof of concept, they demonstrated the capabilities of the device in terms of detections of enzymatic reaction and immobilization of bio-entities.  The proposed highly integrated devices have the potential to largely expand its applications to all the heat-mediated bioassays, particularly with 1-2 order faster thermal response within only 0.5% thermal coupling and smaller volume samples. This work presents an array device consisting of multiple cutting-edge semiconductor components to assist the development of electrical bio assays for medical applications.

 

NEMS & MEMS

22.1: Nanosystems Monolithically Integrated with CMOS: Emerging Applications and Technologies

J. Arcamone et al (U Grenoble, Leti, Minatec),

This paper reviews the last major realizations in the field of monolithic integration of NEMS with CMOS. This integration scheme drastically improves the efficiency of the electrical detection of the NEMS motion. It also represents a compulsory milestone to practically implement breakthrough applications of NEMS, such as mass spectrometry, that require large capture cross section (VLSI-arrayed NEMS) and individual addressing (co-integration of NEMS arrays with CMOS electronic loop).

 

22.2: A Self-sustained Nanomechanical Thermal-piezoresistive Oscillator with Ultra-Low Power Consumption

K.-H. Li et al (National Tsing Hua U)

This work demonstrates wing-type thermal-piezoresistive oscillators operating at about 840 kHz under vacuum with ultralow power consumption of only 70 µW for the first time. The thermally-actuated piezoresistively-sensed (i.e., thermalpiezoresistive) resonator can achieve self-sustained oscillation using a sufficient dc bias current through its thermal beams without additional electronic circuits. By using proper control of silicon etching (ICP) recipe, the submicron cross-sectional dimension of the thermal beams can be easily and reproducibly fabricated in one process step.

 

22.4: High Performance Polysilicon Nanowire NEMS for CMOS Embedded Nanosensors

I. Ouerghiet al (Leti)

The researchers present for the first time sub-100nm poly-Silicon nanowire (poly-Si NW) based NEMS resonators for low-cost co-integrated mass sensors on CMOS featuring excellent performance when compared to crystalline silicon. In particular, comparable quality factors (130 in the air, 3900 in vacuum) and frequency stabilities are demonstrated when compared to crystalline Si. The minimum measured Allan deviation of 7×10-7 leads to a mass resolution detection down to 100 zg (100×10-2 g). Several poly-Si textures are compared and the impact on performances is studied (quality factor, gauge factor, Allan variances, noise, temperature dependence (TCR)). Moreover a novel method for in-line NW gauges factor (GF) extraction is proposed and used.

 

22.5: Integration of RF MEMS Resonators and Phononic Crystals for High Frequency Applications with Frequency-selective Heat Management and Efficient Power Handling

H. Campanella et al (A*STAR, National U Singapore)

A radio frequency micro electromechanical system (RFMEMS) Lamb-wave resonator made of aluminum nitride (AlN) that is integrated with AlN phononic crystal arrays to provide frequency-selective heat management, improved power handling capability, and more efficient electromechanical coupling at ultra high frequency (UHF) bands. RFMEMS+PnC integration is scalable to microwave bands.

 

22.6: A Monolithic 9 Degree of Freedom (DOF) Capacitive Inertial MEMS Platform

I. E. Ocak et al  (IME, A*STAR Singapore)

A 9 degree of freedom inertial MEMS platform, integrating 3 axis gyroscopes, accelerometers, and magnetometers on the same substrate is presented. This method reduces the assembly cost and removes the need for magnetic material deposition and axis misalignment calibration. Platform is demonstrated by comparing fabricated sensor performances with simulation results.

 

15.6: MEMS Tunable Laser Using Photonic Integrated Circuits

M. Ren et al (Nanyang Technological University, A*STAR)

This paper reports a monolithic MEMS tunable laser using silicon photonic integrated circuit, formed in a ring cavity. In particular, all the necessary optical functions in a ring laser system, including beam splitting/combining, isolating, coupling, are realized using the planar passive waveguide structures. Benefited from the high light-confinement capability of silicon waveguides, this design avoids beam divergence in free-space medium as suffered by conventional MEMS tunable lasers, and thus guarantees superior performance. The proposed laser demonstrates large tuning range (55.5 nm),excellent single-mode properties (50 dB side-mode-suppression ratio (SMSR) and 130 kHz linewdith), compact size (3mm × 2mm), and single-chip integration without other separated optical elements.

 

Energy Harvesting

8.4: A High Efficiency Frequency Pre-defined Flow-driven Energy Harvester Dominated by On-chip Modified Helmholtz Resonating Cavity

X.J. Mu et al (A*STAR)

The researchers present a novel flow-driven energy harvester with its frequency dominated by on-chip modified Helmholtz Resonating Cavity (HRC). This device harvests pneumatic kinetic energy efficiently and demonstrates a power density of 117.6 μW/cm2, peak to peak voltage of 5 V, and charging of a 1 μF capacitor in 200 ms.

8.5: Fabrication of Integrated Micrometer Platform for Thermoelectric Measurements

M. Haras et al  (IEMN, ST)

Preliminary simulations of lateral thermo-generators showed that silicon’s harvesting capabilities, through a significant thermal conductivity reduction, could compete with conventional thermoelectric materials, offering additional: CMOS compatibility; harmlessness and cost efficiency. The researchers report the fabrication and characterization of integrated platforms showing a threefold reduction of thermal conductivity in 70nm thick membranes.

 

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This has been the 3rd post in a 3-part series. Part 1 (click here to  read it) of ASN’s IEDM ’14 coverage gave a rundown of the top FD-SOI and SOI-FinFET papers.  Part 2 (click here to  read it) looked at papers covering SOI-based future device architectures.

 

SOI-based future device structures at IEDM ’14 (Part 2 of 3 in ASN’s IEDM coverage)

iedm_logoBeyond FD-SOI and FinFETs, important SOI-based developments in advanced device architectures including nanowires (NW), gate all around (GAA) and other FET structures shared the spotlight at IEDM 2014 (15-17 December in San Francisco). IEDM is the world’s showcase for the most important applied research breakthroughs in transistors and electronics technology.

Here in Part 2 of ASN’s IEDM coverage, we’ll cover future device architectures. In Part 1, we had a rundown of the top SOI-based advanced CMOS papers. In Part 3 we’ll look at MEMS, NEMS, sensors and more.

Summaries culled from the abstracts follow.

16.2: Dual-Channel CMOS Co-Integration with Si Channel NFET and Strained-SiGe Channel PFET in Nanowire Device Architecture Featuring 15nm Gate Length

P. Nguyen et al (Leti, ST, Soitec)

 

Omega-gate CMOS nanowire transistors, with a diameter of 12nm and gate length of 15nm. The NFETs have a silicon channel while the PFETs have a SiGe channel. The germanium (Ge) content is estimated to be 30%. (Courtesy: Leti, ST, Soitec at IEDM 14, Paper 16.2)

Omega-gate CMOS nanowire transistors, with a diameter of 12nm and gate length of 15nm. The NFETs have a silicon channel while the PFETs have a SiGe channel. The germanium (Ge) content is estimated to be 30%. (Courtesy: Leti, ST, Soitec at IEDM
14, Paper 16.2)

The researchers have fabricated the first hybrid channel omega-gate CMOS nanowire (NW) with strained SiGe-channel (cSiGe) p-FETs and Si-channel n-FET. An optimized process flow based on the Ge enrichment technique results in a +135% hole mobility enhancement at long gate lengths compared to Si. Effectiveness of cSiGe channel is also evidenced for ultra-scaled p-FET NW (LG=15 nm) with +90% ION current improvement. [110]-oriented NW is shown to be the best candidate to improve drive current under compressive strain. In this work, the strain is measured by using precession electron diffraction with a 1nm spatial resolution. Furthermore, they show that hybrid integration reduces the delay of CMOS ring oscillator (FO=3) by 50% at VDD=0.9V. Finally, they demonstrate the most aggressively scaled hybrid CMOS NWs reported to date with NW width and gate length down to 7nm and 11nm, while maintaining high drive current (687µA/µm for p-FET and 647µA/µm for n-FET) with low leakage current and excellent short-channel-control (DIBL<50mV/V).

 

20.5: Study of the Piezoresistive Properties of NMOS and PMOS Omega-Gate SOI Nanowire Transistors: Scalability Effects and High Stress Level

J. Pelloux-Prayer et al (Leti, Soitec, Tokyo Tech)

The researchers present a comprehensive study of piezoresistive properties of aggressively scaled MOSFET devices. For the first time, the evolution of the piezoresistive coefficients with scaled dimensions is presented (gate length down to 20nm and channel width down to 8nm), and from the low to high stress regime (above 1GPa). They show that the downscaling of geometrical parameters doesn’t allow the use of the conventional definition of piezoresistivity tensor elements. The obtained results give a comprehensive insight on strain engineering ability in aggressively scaled CMOS technology.

 

20.3: Direct Observation of Self-heating in III-V Gate-all-around Nanowire MOSFETs

S.H. Shin et al (Purdue U)

Multi-gate devices, such as, FinFET, Gate-all-around transistors (GAA-FET) improve 3D electrostatic control of the channel, but the corresponding increase in self-heating may compromise both performance and reliability. Although the self-heating effect (SHE) of FinFET appears significant, but tolerable, the same may not be true for GAA geometry, especially in quasi-ballistic regime where hot spots and non-classical heat-dissipation pathways may lead to localized damage. The existing reports of the SHE on the SOI, FinFET or GAA-FET have so far relied either on indirect electrical measurements with inherent temporal delays, or on optical infra-red (λ>1.5μm ) imaging that cannot resolve deep submicron features. As a result, it has so far been impossible to resolve the spatio-temporal features of SHE fully. In this paper, the researchers develop an ultra-fast, high resolution thermo-reflectance (TR) imaging technique to (i) directly observe the local temperature rise of GAA-FET with different number of nanowires (NW)(ii) characterize/interpret the time constants of heating and cooling through high resolution transient measurements, (iii) identify critical paths for heat dissipation, and (iv) detect in-situ time-dependent breakdown of individual NW.

 

9.6: In-situ Doped and Tensilely Stained Ge Junctionless Gate-all-around nFETs on SOI Featuring Ion = 828µA/µm, Ion/Ioff ~ 1×105, DIBL= 16-54 mV/V, and 1.4X External Strain Enhancement

I-H. Wong et al (Taiwan U)

In-situ CVD doping and laser annealing can reach [P] and tensile strain as high as 2×1020 cm-3 and 0.37%. Junctionless Ge gate-all-around nFETs with 9 nm-Wfin and 0.8 nm-EOT achieves the record high Ion of 828 µA/µm. The Ion enhancement of ~40% is achieved under the tensile strain of 0.25%.

 

27.6: Flexible High-performance Nonvolatile Memory by Transferring GAA Silicon Nanowire SONOS onto a Plastic Substrate

J.-M. Choi et al (KAIST, NASA)

Flexible nonvolatile memory is demonstrated with excellent memory properties comparable to the traditional wafer-based rigid type of memory. This  achievement is realized through the transfer of an ultrathin film consisting of single crystalline silicon nanowire (SiNW) gate-all-around (GAA) SONOS memory devices onto a plastic substrate from a host silicon wafer.

13.2: High Ion/Ioff Ge-source Ultrathin Body Strained-SOI Tunnel FETs – Impact of Channel Strain, MOS Interfaces and Back Gate on the Electrical Properties

M. Kim et al (U Tokyo)

The researchers demonstrated Ge/strained-Si hetero-junction TFETs with in-situ B doped Ge. The increase in channel strain and optimization of PMA have successfully realized high performance of steep SSmin below 30 mV/dec and large Ion/Ioff ratio over 3×107.

13.3: Comprehensive Performance Re-assessment of TFETs with a Novel Design by Gate and Source Engineering from Device/Circuit Perspective

Q. Huang et al (Peking U)

In this paper, a novel TFET design, called Pocket-mSTFET, is proposed and experimentally demonstrated by evaluating the performance from device metrics to circuit implementation for low-power SoC applications. For the first time, from a circuit design perspective, TFETs performance in terms of ION, IOFF, subthreshold slope (SS), output behavior, capacitance, delay, noise and gain are experimentally benchmarked and also compared with MOSFET. By gate and source engineering without area penalty, the compatibly-fabricated Pocket-mSTFET on SOI substrate shows superior performance with the minimum SS of 29mV/dec at 300K, high ION (~20μA/μm) and large ION/IOFF ratio (~108) at 0.6V. Circuit-level implementation based on Pocket-mSTFET also shows significant improvement on energy efficiency and power reduction at VDD of 0.4V, which indicates great potential of this TFET design for low-power digital and analog applications.

13.4: A Schottky-Barrier Silicon FinFET with 6.0 mV/dec Subthreshold Slope over 5 Decades of Current

J. Zhang et al (EPFL)

The researchers demonstrate a steep subthreshold slope silicon FinFET with Schottky source/drain. The device shows a minimal SS of 3.4 mV/dec and an average SS of 6.0 mV/dec over 5 decades of current swing. Ultra-low leakage floor of 0.06 pA/μm is also achieved with high Ion/Ioff ratio of 107.

 

26.2: Thin-Film Heterojunction Field-Effect Transistors for Ultimate Voltage Scaling and Low-Temperature Large-Area Fabrication of Active-Matrix Backplanes

B. Hekmatshoar et al (IBM)

Heterojunction field-effect thin-film transistors with crystalline Si channels and gate regions comprised of hydrogenated amorphous silicon or organic materials are demonstrated. The HJFET devices are processed at 200ºC and room temperature, respectively; and exhibit operation voltages below 1V, subthreshold slopes of 70-100mV/dec and off currents as low as 25 fA/um.

 

26.7 Performance Enhancement of a Novel P-type Junctionless Transistor Using a Hybrid Poly-Si Fin Channel for 3D IC Applications

Y.-C. Cheng et al (National Tsing Hua U, National Chiao Tung U)

The hybrid fin poly-Si channel junctionless field-effect transistors (FET) are fabricated first. This novel devices show stable temperature/reliability characteristics, and excellent electrical performances in terms of steep SS (64mV/dec), high Ion/Ioff (>107) and small DIBL (3mV/V). The devices are highly promising for future further scaling and 3D stacked ICs applications.

 

35.1: A Physics-based Compact Model for FETs from Diffusive to Ballistic Carrier Transport Regimes

S. Rakhejaet al (MIT, Purdue U)

The virtual source (VS) model provides a simple, physical description of transistors that operate in the quasi-ballistic regime. Through comparisons to measured data, key device parameters can be extracted. The VS model suffers from three limitations: i) it is restricted to short channels, ii) the transition between linear and saturation regions is treated empirically, and iii) the injection velocity cannot be predicted, it must be extracted by fitting the model to measured data. This paper discusses a new model, which uses only a few physical parameters and is fully consistent with the VS model. The new model: i) describes both short and long channel devices, ii) provides a description of the current at any drain voltage without empirical fitting, and iii) predicts the injection velocity (device on-current). The accuracy of the model is demonstrated by comparison with measured data for III-V HEMTs and ETSOI Si MOSFETs.

 

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This is the 2nd post in a 3-part series. Part 1 (click here to  read it) of ASN’s IEDM ’14 coverage gave a rundown of the top FD-SOI and SOI-FinFET papers.  Part 3 (click here to read it) covers SOI-based MEMS, NEMS, sensors and more.

 

10nm FD-SOI, SOI FinFETs at IEDM ’14 (Part 1 of 3 in ASN’s IEDM coverage)

iedm_logoFD-SOI at 10nm (and other nodes) as well as SOI FinFETs shared the spotlight at IEDM 2014 (15-17 December in San Francisco), the world’s showcase for the most important applied research breakthroughs in transistors and electronics technology.

There were about 40 SOI-based papers presented at IEDM. Here in Part 1 of ASN’s IEDM coverage, we have a rundown of the top SOI-based advanced CMOS papers. In Part 2, we’ll cover papers on future device architectures. In Part 3 we’ll look at the papers on MEMS, NEMS, sensors and more.

Summaries culled from the abstracts follow.

 

The FD-SOI Papers

9.1: FD-SOI CMOS Devices Featuring Dual Strained Channel and Thin BOX Extendable to the 10nm Node.

Q. Liu et al (STMicroelectronics, CEA-LETI, IBM, Soitec)

In their IEDM ‘14 paper 9.1 on 10nm FD-SOI, ST, IBM, Leti and Soitec reported a low-temperature process that was developed to form a defect-free SiGe channel from the strained SOI starting substrate. (Image courtesy: ST et al, IEDM 2014)

In their IEDM ‘14 paper 9.1 on 10nm FD-SOI, ST, IBM, Leti and Soitec reported a low-temperature process that was developed to form a defect-free SiGe channel from the strained SOI starting substrate. (Image courtesy: ST et al, IEDM 2014)

In this work, researchers from STMicroelectronics and the IBM Technology Development Alliance demonstrate the successful implementation of strained FDSOI devices with LG, spacer & BOX dimensions scaled to 10nm feature sizes.

Two additional enabling elements for scaling FD-SOI devices to the 10nm node are reported: advanced strain techniques for performance improvement, and reduced BOX thickness for better SCE & higher body factor. The researchers also report the first demonstration of strain reversal in strained SOI by the incorporation of SiGe in a short-channel PFET device. With regard to performance, at 0.75V the devices achieved a competitive effective drive current of 340 µA/µm for NFET at Ioff=1 nA/um (the highest performing FD-SOI NFET ever reported), and with a fully compressively strained 30% SiGe-on-insulator (SGOI) channel on a thin (20nm) BOX substrate, PFET effective drive current was 260 µA/µm at Ioff=1 nA/um. Competitive sub-threshold slope and DIBL are also reported.

 

[13] and [14] are Intel papers on 22nm bulk FinFET. [15] is TSMC on 16nm bulk FinFET. [9] is Leti et al on 14nm FD-SOI. “This work” pertains to the 10nm FD-SOI process presented by ST et al at IEDM ‘14. (Courtesy: ST et al, IEDM 2014)

[13] and [14] are Intel papers on 22nm bulk FinFET. [15] is TSMC on 16nm bulk FinFET. [9] is Leti et al on 14nm FD-SOI. “This work” pertains to the 10nm FD-SOI process presented by ST et al at IEDM ‘14.
(Courtesy: ST et al, IEDM 2014)

7.2: A Mobility Enhancement Strategy for sub-14nm Power-efficient FDSOI Technologies

B. De Salvo et al. (Leti, ST, IMEP, IBM, Soitec)

This paper presents an original multi-level evaluation methodology for stress engineering device design of next-generation power-efficient devices. Ring oscillator simulations showed that a dynamic power gain of 50% could be achieved while maintaining circuit frequency performance thanks to the use of efficient mobility boosters. Thus a clear scaling path to achieve high-mobility, power-efficient sub-14nm FDSOI technologies has been identified.

 

3.4: Single-P-Well SRAM Dynamic Characterization with Back-Bias Adjustment for Optimized Wide-Voltage Range SRAM Operation in 28nm UTBB FD-SOI

O. Thomas et al (UC Berkeley, ST)

This paper demonstrates the 28nm ultra-thin body and buried oxide (UTBB) FD-SOI high-density (0.120µm²) single pwell (SPW) bitcell architecture for the design of low-power wide voltage range systems enabled by back-bias adjustment. A 410mV minimum operating voltage and less than 310mV data retention voltage with less than 100fA/bitcell are measured in a 140kb programmable dynamic SRAM. Improved bitcell read access time and write-ability through back-bias are demonstrated with less than 5% of stand-by power overhead.

 

27.5: New Insights on Bottom Layer Thermal Stability and Laser Annealing Promises for High Performance 3D Monolithic Integration

C. Fenouillet-Beranger et al (Leti, ST, LASSE)

For the first time the maximum thermal budget of in-situ doped source/drain state-of-the-art FD-SOI bottom MOSFET transistors is quantified to ensure transistors stability in Monolithic 3D (M3D) integration. Thanks to silicide stability improvement, the top MOSFET temperature could be relaxed up to 500°C. Laser anneal is then considered as a promising candidate for junctions activation. Thanks to in-depth morphological and electrical characterizations, it shows very promising results for high performance Monolithic 3D integration.

 

9.2 Future Challenges and opportunities for Heterogeneous process technology. Toward the thin films, Zero intrinsic Variabiliiy devices, Zero power Era (Invited)

S. Deleonibus et al (Leti)

By 2025, 25 % of the World Gross Domestic Product will depend on the development of Information and Communication Technologies . Less greedy device, interconnect, computing technologies and architectures are essential to aim at x1000 less power consumption.

IBM’s SOI-FinFET, eDRAM and 3D Papers

32.1: Electrical Characterization of FinFET with Fins Formed by Directed Self Assembly at 29 nm Fin Pitch Using a Self-Aligned Fin Customization Scheme

H. Tsai et al (IBM)

These drawings illustrate the process flow for forming groups of SOI fins using the directed self-assembly technique. (IBM at IEDM ’14, paper 32.1)

These drawings illustrate the process flow for forming groups of SOI fins using the directed self-assembly technique. (IBM at IEDM ’14, paper 32.1)

High density fin formation is one of the most critical processes in the FinFET device fabrication flow. Given that a typical device is composed of an ensemble of fins, each fin must be nearly identical to avoid performance degradation arising from geometric variation. Thus, techniques for fin patterning must demonstrate the ability to form fins with a high degree of structural precision. In this paper, IBM researchers present the use of directed self-assembly using block copolymers (BCP) and 193nm immersion (193i) lithography as a suitable way to make the fins of FinFETs for beyond the 10 nm node.

(a) Shows groups of two fins formed by the process, while (b) is a cross-sectional image of a larger group of fins. (IBM at IEDM ’14, paper 32.1)

(a) Shows groups of two fins formed by the process, while (b) is a cross-sectional image of a larger group of fins. (IBM at IEDM ’14, paper 32.1)

 

Essentially, a topographic template pattern was created on a chemically neutral surface. Confinement of the BCP between the sidewalls of the template provides an ordering force that drives the pattern into registry with the surface topography. Electrical data produced from fins with a 29-nm pitch patterned with this approach showed good uniformity, with no signs of gross variation in critical dimensions.

Fabrication of FinFET devices using the self-assembly process (a) before customization; (b) after customization; (c) after gate patterning; and (d) after spacer formation and epitaxial Si growth. (IBM at IEDM ’14, paper 32.1)

Fabrication of FinFET devices using the self-assembly process (a) before customization; (b) after customization; (c) after gate patterning; and (d) after spacer formation and epitaxial Si growth. (IBM at IEDM ’14, paper 32.1)

 

3.8 High Performance 14nm SOI FinFET CMOS Technology with 0.0174μm2 embedded DRAM and 15 Levels of Cu Metallization (Late News)

C-H. Lin et al (IBM)

The IBM team presents a fully integrated 14nm CMOS technology featuring FinFET architecture on an SOI substrate for a diverse set of SoC applications including high-performance server microprocessors and low-power ASICs. A unique dual workfunction process optimizes the threshold voltages of both NMOS and PMOS transistors without any mobility degradation in the channel and without reliance on problematic approaches like heavy doping or Lgate modulation to create Vt differentiation. The IBM technology features what may be the smallest, densest embedded DRAM memory ever demonstrated (a cell size of just 0.0174µm2) for high-speed performance in a fully integrated process flow. Because the technology is envisioned for use in SoC applications ranging from video game consoles to enterprise-level corporate data centers, the IBM design also features a record 15 levels of copper interconnect to give circuit designers more freedom than ever before to distribute power and clock signals efficiently across an entire SoC chip, which may be as large as 600mm2.

The SOI FinFET’s excellent subthreshold behavior allows gate length scaling to the sub 20nm regime and superior low Vdd operation. This leads to a substantial (>35%) performance gain for Vdd ~0.8V compared to the HP 22nm planar predecessor technology. At the same time, the exceptional FE/BE reliability enables high Vdd (>1.1V) operation essential to the high single thread performance for processors intended for ‘scale-up’ enterprise systems. A hierarchical BEOL with 15 levels of copper interconnect delivers both high performance wire-ability as well as effective power supply and clock distribution for very large >600mm2 SoCs.

 

16.1: First Demonstration of High-Ge-Content Strained-Si1-xGex (x=0.5) on Insulator PMOS FinFETs with High Hole Mobility and Aggressively Scaled Fin Dimensions and Gate Lengths for High-Performance Applications

P. Hashemi et al (IBM)

Strained SiGe FinFETs are a promising PMOS technology for the 10nm technology node and beyond, due to their excellent electrostatics and built-in uniaxial compression. Yet while SiGe FinFETs with moderate germanium (Ge) content have been characterized, little data exists on FinFETs with high Ge  content. And, what little data does exist is mostly focused on relaxed or strained pure Ge. For the first time anywhere, IBM detailed CMOS-compatible, low-power and high-performance SiGe PMOS FinFETs with more than 50% Ge content. The devices feature ultra-narrow fin widths – down to 3.3 nm – which provide excellent short-channel control for low-power applications.  Using a Si-cap-free passivation process, they report SS=68mV/dec and μeff=390±12 cm2/Vs at Ninv=1e13 cm-2, outperforming the state-of-the-art relaxed Ge FinFETs. They demonstrated the highest performance ever reported (Ion=0.42mA/µm and Ioff=100nA/µm) for sub-20nm PMOS FinFETs at 0.5 V.

 

19.4: 0.026µm2 High Performance Embedded DRAM in 22nm Technology for Server and SOC Applications

C. Pei et al (IBM)

This paper presents the industry’s smallest eDRAM based on IBM’s 22nm (partially depleted) SOI technology, which has been recently leveraged for IBM’s 12-core 649mm2 Server Processor POWER8™. It summarizes the n-band resistance innovations, and reports for the first time the asymmetric embedded stressor, cavity implant and through gate implant employed in 22nm eDRAM technology. The fully integrated 256Mb product array has demonstrated capability of 1.4ns cycle time, which is significantly faster than any other embedded DRAM.

 

14.6: Through Silicon Via (TSV) Effects on Devices in Close Proximity– the Role of Mobile Ion Penetration – Characterization and Mitigation

C. Kothandaraman et al (IBM)

The research team identified and studied a new interaction between TSV processes and devices in close proximity, different from mechanical stress. Detailed characterization via Triangular Voltage Sweep (TVS) and SIMS shows the role of mobile ion penetration from BEOL layers. They then presented an improved process, confirmed in test structures and DRAM.

 

RF-SOI

18.4: Technology Pathfinders for Low Cost and Highly Integrated RF Front End Modules

C. Raynaud (Leti)

This paper highlights the challenges related to the increasing number of modes (GSM, WCDMA, LTE) and frequency bands in mobile devices. It describes the technology pathfinders to get cheaper highly integrated multimode multi–band RF Front End modules.

 

~ ~ ~

This is the 1st post in a 3-part series. Part 2 (click here to  read it) of ASN’s IEDM ’14 coverage looks at papers covering SOI-based future device architectures.  Part 3 (click here to read it) covers SOI-based MEMS, NEMS, sensors and more.

MonolithIC3D CEO Says SOI’s the Future Technology of Semiconductors

Zvi-F10-12-23Following IEDM (Dec. ’13), Zvi Or-Bach, President & CEO of posted a SemiMD blog (click here) entitled Why SOI is the Future Technology of Semiconductors.  Beginning with the assertions that it’s cheaper and easier for FinFETS, it’s a natural for monolithic 3D ICs, and it best for next-gen transistor architectures, he goes on to elaborate on each of these points.   He cites presentations by GloFo and IBS for cost, then delves into Leti’s sequential 3D technology, leveraging FD-SOI and FinFETs, as well as other SOI-based monolithic 3D IC integration developments. A recommended read.

IEDM ’13 (Part 2): More SOI and Advanced Substrate Papers

SOI and other advanced substrates were the basis for dozens of excellent papers at IEDM ’13.  Last week we covered the FD-SOI papers (click here if you missed that piece). In this post, we’ll cover the other major SOI et al papers – including those on FinFETs, RF and various advanced devices.

Brief summaries, culled from the program (and some of the actual papers) follow.

 

SOI-FinFETS

9.4 2nd Generation Dual-Channel Optimization with cSiGe for 22nm HP Technology and Beyond (IBM)

This paper about performance boosters is applicable to all flavors of SOI-based devices, including FinFET, planar FD-SOI and partially-depleted SOI. At 22nm for high-performance (HP), IBM is still doing the traditional partially-depleted (PD) SOI. At 14nm, when they go to SOI-FinFETs, one of the channel stressors to boost performance is Silicon-Germanium (cSiGe). To better understand the physics, layout effects and impact of cSiGe on device performance, IBM leveraged their 22nm HP technology to do a comprehensive study. They got a 20% performance boost and 10% Short Channel Effect (SCE) improvement, and showed that this 2nd generation high-performance dual-channel process can be integrated into a manufacturable and yieldable technology, thereby providing a solid platform for introduction of SiGe FinFet technology.

 

13.5 Comprehensive study of effective current variability and MOSFET parameter correlations in 14nm multi-Fin SOI FINFETs  (GlobalFoundries, IBM)

SOI FINFETs are very attractive because of their added immunity to Vt variability due to undoped channels. However, circuit level performance also depends on the effective current (Ieff) variability. According to the advance program, “A first time rigorous experimental study of effective current (Ieff) variability in high-volume manufacturable (HVM) 14nm Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) FINFETs is reported which identifies, threshold voltage (Vtlin), external resistance (Rext), and channel trans-conductance (Gm) as three independent sources of variation. The variability in Gm, Vtlin (AVT=1.4(n)/0.7(p) mV-μm), and Ieff exhibit a linear Pelgrom fit indicating local variations, along with non-zero intercept which suggests the presence of global variations at the wafer level. Relative contribution of Gm to Ieff variability is dominant in FINFETs with small number of fins (Nfin); however, both Gm and Rext variations dominate in large Nfin devices. Relative contribution of Vtlin remains almost independent of Nfin. Both n and p FINFETs show the above mentioned trends.”

 

20.5 Heated Ion Implantation Technology for Highly Reliable Metal-gate/High-k CMOS SOI FinFETs (AIST, Nissin Ion Equipment)

In this paper, the researchers thoroughly investigated the impact of the heated ion implantation (I/I) technology on HK/MG SOI FinFET performance and reliability, which it turns out is excellent. They demonstrated that “…the heated I/I brings perfect crystallization after annealing even in ultrathin Si channel. For the first time, it was found that the heated I/I dramatically improves the characteristics such as Ion-Ioff, Vth variability, and bias temperature instability (BTI) for both nMOS and pMOS FinFETs in comparison with conventional room temperature I/I.”

 

26.2:  Advantage of (001)/<100> oriented Channel to Biaxial and Uniaxial Strained Ge-on-Insulator pMOSFETs with NiGe S/D (AIST)

In this paper about boosters in fully-depleted planar SOI and GeOI based devices, the researchers “compared current drivability between (001)/<100> and (001)/<110> strained Ge-on-insulator pMOSFETs under biaxial and uniaxial stress.” They experimentally demonstrated for the first time that in short channel (Lg < 100 nm) devices, <100> channels exhibit higher drive current than <110> channels under both the biaxial- and the uniaxial stress, in spite of the disadvantage in mobility, although this is not the case with longer channel devices. The advantage is attributable to higher drift velocity in high electric field along the direction and becomes more significant for shorter Lg devices. The strained-Ge (001)/<100> channel MOSFET have a potential to serve as pFET of ultimately scaled future CMOS.

 

33.1 Simulation Based Transistor-SRAM Co-Design in the Presence of Statistical Variability and Reliability (Invited) (U. Glasgow, GSS, IBM)

With ever-reducing design cycles and time-to-market, design teams need early delivery of a reliable PDK before mature silicon data becomes available. This paper shows that the GSS ‘atomistic’ simulator GARAND used in this study provides accurate prediction of transistor characteristics, performance and variability at the early stages of new technology development and can serve as a reliable source for PDK development of emerging technologies, such as SOI FinFET.  Specifically, the authors report on, “…a systematic simulation study of the impact of process and statistical variability and reliability on SRAM cell design in a 14nm technology node SOI FinFET transistors. A comprehensive statistical compact modeling strategy is developed for early delivery of a reliable PDK, which enables TCAD- based transistor-SRAM co-design and path finding for emerging technology nodes.” 

 

RF-SOI

1.3: Smart Mobile SoC Driving the Semiconductor Industry: Technology Trend, Challenges and Opportunities (Qualcomm)

In this plenary presentation, Geoffry Yeap, VP of Technology at Qualcomm gave a perspective on state of the art mobile SoCs and RF/analog technologies for RF SOCs. The challenge, he said in his paper, is “…lower power for days of active use”. He cited the backgate for asymmetric gate operation and dynamic Vt control, noting that FinFETs lack an easy way to access the back gates. “This is especially crucial when Vdd continues to scale lower to a point that there is just not sufficient (Vg-Vt) to yield meaningful drive current,” he continued. While he sees FD-SOI “very attractive”, he is concerned about the ecosystem, capacity and starting wafer price.

With respect to RF-SOI, the summary of his talk in the program stated, “Cost/power reduction and unique product capability are enabled by RF front end integration of power amplifiers, antenna switches/tuners and power envelope tracker through a cost-effective RF-SOI instead of the traditional GaAs.”

 

Advanced Devices

Post-FinFETs, one of the next-generation device architectures being heavily investigated now is  gate-all-around (GAA). While FinFETs have gate material on three sides, in GAA devices the gate completely surrounds the channel. A popular fabrication technique is to build them around a nanowire, often on an SOI substrate.

4.4 Demonstration of Improved Transient Response of Inverters with Steep Slope Strained Si NW TFETs by Reduction of TAT with Pulsed I-V and NW Scaling  (Forschungszentrum Jülich, U. Udine, Soitec)

This is a paper about a strained Si (sSi) nanowire array Tunnel FETs (TFETs). The researchers demonstrated that scaled gate all around (GAA) strained Si (sSi) nanowire array (NW) Tunnel FETs (TFETs) allow steep slope switching with remarkable high ION due to optimized tunneling junctions. Very steep tunneling junctions have been achieved by implantations into silicide (IIS) and dopant segregation (DS) with epitaxial Ni(AlxSi1-x)2 source and drain. The low temperature and pulse measurements demonstrate steep slope TFETs with very high I60 as TAT is suppressed. GAA NW TFETs seem less vulnerable to trap assisted tunneling (TAT). Time response analysis of complementary-TFET inverters demonstrated experimentally for the first time that device scaling and improved electrostatics yields to faster time response.

 

IBM_IEDMBangsaruntip20.2Fig.4

(image courtesy: IBM, IEEE/IEDM)

20.2 Density Scaling with Gate-All-Around Silicon Nanowire MOSFETs for the 10 nm Node and Beyond (IBM)

Record Silicon Nanowire MOSFETs: IBM researchers described a silicon nanowire (SiNW)-based MOSFET fabrication process that produced gate-all-around (GAA) SiNW devices at sizes compatible with the scaling needs of 10-nm CMOS technology. They built a range of GAA SiNW MOSFETs, some of which featured an incredible 30-nm SiNW pitch (the spacing between adjacent nanowires) with a gate pitch of 60 nm. Devices with a 90-nm gate pitch demonstrated the highest performance ever reported for a SiNW device at a gate pitch below 100 nm— peak/saturation current of 400/976 µA/µm, respectively, at 1 V. Although this work focused on NFETs, the researchers say the same fabrication techniques can be used to produce PFETs as well, opening the door to a potential ultra-dense, high-performance CMOS technology.

 

 

26.4 FDSOI Nanowires: An Opportunity for Hybrid Circuit with Field Effect and Single Electron Transistors (Invited) (Leti)

This paper is about nanowires and single electron transistors (SET).  As indicated in the  program, “When FDSOI nanowires width is scaled down to 5nm, the nanowires can encounter a dramatic transition to single electron transistor characteristics. This enables the first room temperature demonstration of hybrid SET-FET circuits thus paving the way for new logic paradigms based on SETs. Further scaling would rely on deterministic dopant positioning. We have also shown that Si based electron pumps using tunable barriers based on FETs are promising candidates to realize the quantum definition of the Ampere.”

 

26.6 Asymmetrically Strained High Performance Germanium Gate-All-Around Nanowire p-FETs Featuring 3.5 nm Wire Width and Contractable Phase Change Liner Stressor (Ge2Sb2Te5) (National U. Singapore, Soitec)

In this paper about GAA and nanowires, the researchers report “…the first demonstration of germanium (Ge) GAA nanowire (NW) p-FETs integrated with a contractable liner stressor. High performance GAA NW p-FET featuring the smallest wire width WNW of ~3.5 nm was fabricated. Peak intrinsic Gm of 581 μS/μm and SS of 125 mV/dec was demonstrated. When the Ge NW p-FETs were integrated with the phase change material Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) as a liner stressor, the high asymmetric strain was induced in the channel to boost the hole mobility, leading to ~95% intrinsic Gm,lin and ~34% Gm,sat enhancement. Strain and mobility simulations show good scalability of GST liner stressor and great potential for hole mobility enhancement.”

 

III-V, More Than Moore and Other Interesting Topics

28.5 More than Moore: III-V Devices and Si CMOS Get It Together (Invited) (Raytheon)

This is continuation of a major ongoing III-V and CMOS  integration project that Raytheon et al wrote about in ASN five years ago (see article here).  As noted in the IEDM program, the authors “…summarize results on the successful integration of III-V electronic devices with Si CMOS on a common silicon substrate using a fabrication process similar to SiGe BiCMOS. The heterogeneous integration of III-V devices with Si CMOS enables a new class of high performance, ‘digitally assisted’, mixed signal and RF ICs.

 

31.1 Technology Downscaling Worsening Radiation Effects in Bulk: SOI to the Rescue (Invited) (ST)

In this paper, the authors explore the reliability issues faced by the next generation of devices.  As they note in the description of the paper in the program, “Extrinsic atmospheric radiations are today as important to IC reliability as intrinsic failure modes. More and more industry segments are impacted. Sub-40nm downscaling has a profound impact on the Soft Error Rate (SER) of BULK technologies. The enhanced resilience of latest SOI technologies will fortunately help leveraging existing robust design solutions.”

 

13.3 A Multi-Wavelength 3D-Compatible Silicon Photonics Platform on 300mm SOI Wafers for 25Gb/s Applications (ST, Luxtera)

Luxtera’s work on Silicon Photonics and now products based on integrated optical communications has been covered here at ASN for years. In this paper Luxtera and ST (which now is Luxtera’s manufacturing partner) present a low-cost 300mm Silicon Photonics platform for 25Gb/s application compatible with 3D integration and featuring competitive optical passive and active performance. This platform aims at industrialization and offering to system designers a wide choice of electronic IC, targeting markets applications in the field of Active optical cables, optical Modules, Backplanes and Silicon  Photonics Interposer.

 

Irisawa (2.2) Fig.9

The graph above shows the high electron mobility of Triangular MOSFETs with InGaAs Channels. (Image courtesy: AIST, IEEE/IEDM) 

 

2.2. High Electron Mobility Triangular InGaAs-OI nMOSFETs with (111)B Side Surfaces Formed by MOVPE Growth on Narrow Fin Structures (AIST, Sumitomo, Tokyo Institute of Technology)

InGaAs is a promising channel material for high-performance, ultra-low-power n-MOSFETs because of its high electron mobility, but multiple-gate architectures are required to make the most of it, because multiple gates offer better control of electrostatics. In addition, it is difficult to integrate highly crystalline InGaAs with silicon, so having multiple gates offers the opportunity to take advantage of the optimum crystal facet of the material for integration. A research team led by Japan’s AIST built triangular InGaAs-on-insulator nMOSFETs with smooth side surfaces along the <111>B crystal facet and with bottom widths as narrow as 30 nm, using a metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) growth technique. The devices demonstrated a high on-current of 930 μA/μm at a 300-nm gate length, showing they have great potential for ultra-low power and high performance CMOS applications.

 

16.4. High performance sub-20-nm-channel-length extremely-thin body InAs-on-insulator Tri-gate MOSFETs with high short channel effect immunity and Vth tenability (Sumitomo, Tokyo Institute of Technology)

This III-V paper investigates the effects of vertical scaling and the tri-gate structure on electrical properties of extremely-thin-body (ETB) InAs-on-insulator (-OI) MOSFETs. “It was found that Tbody scaling provides better SCEs control, whereas Tbody scaling causes μfluctuation reduction. To achieve better SCEs control, Tchannel scaling is more favorable than Tbuffer scaling, indicating QW channel structure with MOS interface buffer is essential in InAs-OI MOSFETs. Also, the Tri-gate ETB InAs-OI MOSFETs shows significant improvement of short channel effects (SCEs) control with small effective mobility (μeff) reduction. As a result, we have successfully fabricated sub-20-nm-Lch InAs-OI MOSFETs with good electrostatic with S.S. of 84 mV/dec, DIBL of 22 mV/V, and high transconductance (Gm) of 1.64 mS/μm. Furthermore, we have demonstrated wide-range threshold voltage (Vth) tunability in Tri-gate InAs-OI MOSFETs through back bias voltage (VB) control. These results strongly suggest that the Tri-gate ETB III-V-OI structure is very promising scaled devices on the Si platform to simultaneously satisfy high performance high SCE immunity and Vth tunability.”

11.1 A Flexible Ultra-Thin-Body SOI Single-Photon Avalanche Diode (TU Delft)

This is a paper on flexible electronics for display and imaging systems. “The world’s first flexible ultra-thin-body SOI single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) is reported by device layer transfer to plastic with peak PDP at 11%, DCR around 20kHz and negligible after pulsing and cross-talk. It compares favorably with CMOS SPADs while it can operate both in FSI and BSI with 10mm bend diameter,” say the researchers.

 

11.7 Local Transfer of Single-Crystalline Silicon (100) Layer by Meniscus Force and Its Application to High-Performance MOSFET Fabrication on Glass Substrate (Hiroshima U.)

In this is a paper on flexible electronics for display and imaging systems, the researchers “…propose a novel low-temperature local layer transfer technique using meniscus force. Local transfer of the thermally-oxidized SOI layer to glass was carried out without any problem. The n-channel MOSFET fabricated on glass using the SOI layer showed very high mobility of 742 cm2V-1s-1, low threshold voltage of 1.5 V.  These results suggest that the proposed (meniscus force-mediated layer transfer) technique (MLT) and MOSFET fabrication process opens up a new field of silicon applications that is independent of scaling.”

 

Note: the papers themselves are typically available through the IEEE Xplore Digital Libary within a few months of the conference.

 

Special thanks to Mariam Sadaka and Bich-Yen Nguyen of Soitec for their help and guidance in compiling this post.

SOI Luminaries Shine in IEDM Awards

Of those receiving top awards at the IEDM last month, over half (!) are stars of the SOI community. Wow.

I discovered this while putting together the new listing of SOI-based papers at IEDM (don’t miss the summaries & links now posted in ASN’s most recent PaperLinks).

At the IEDM, the IEEE also awarded the title of “Fellow” to more major figures in the SOI world – see that article in ASN#15.

The IEDM is considered by many to be the most prestigious of the industry’s conferences. Here’s the “SOI list” of the most recent award winners.

2010 IEEE Cledo Brunetti Award

To: Ghavam G. Shahidi, IBM T.J. Watson Research Center

“For contributions to and leadership in the development of silicon-on-insulator CMOS technology.”

Ghavam Shahidi has been the driving force in making SOI a manufacturable reality and an integral component of today’s microelectronics.  He is currently the director of Silicon Technology at the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center.

2010 IEEE Andrew S. Grove Award

To: Bijan Davari, IBM T.J Watson Research Center

“For contributions to high performance deep-submicron CMOS technology.”

To create faster, higher-function and low-power microprocessor chips, Bijan Davari and his research team at IBM spearheaded critical changes in chip design to take advantage of new semiconductor materials and processes, including SOI.  He is currently vice president of Next Generation Computing Systems/Technology at the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center.

2010 IEEE Frederik Philips Award

To: John E. Kelly III, IBM

“For leadership in the development and commercialization of silicon technology and for forging industry-university partnerships for semiconductor research and development.”

John E. Kelly III is an executive whose strategic vision has led IBM to major technology breakthroughs and partnerships that have set the pace for the semiconductor industry, including bringing SOI to the high-performance microprocessor market. He is currently senior vice president and director of research at IBM Research.

2010 IEEE Kiyo Tomiyasu Award

To: Tsu-Jae King Liu, University of California at Berkeley

“For contributions to nanoscale MOS transistors, memory devices, and MEMs devices.”

Tsu-Jae King Liu is a researcher who co-invented the FinFET, and who has contributed to improving microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology and CMOS. She is currently the Conexant Systems Distinguished Professor at the University of California, Berkeley, where she is also the College of Engineering’s Associate Dean for Research. (Click here to see the FDSOI articles she’s contributed to ASN.)

2009 Roger A. Haken Best Student Paper Award

To: Perrine Batude of CEA-LETI-MINATEC for Advances in 3D CMOS Sequential Integration

The winning paper (awarded at IEDM 2010) is based on Perrine Batude’s PhD dissertation, which she completed at Léti in late 2009.  Leveraging FD-SOI, the work in this paper demonstrates the possibility of obtaining regular 2D performance within a 3D sequential integration scheme. It further investigates the unique features of low temperature processes. Finally, it quantifies for the first time, the electrostatic coupling between the layers. Dr. Batude has a degree from the Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Physique de Grenoble, and specializes in the 3D integration of elementary functions. Léti hired her as soon as she finished her dissertation.

2010 EDS J.J. Ebers Award

To: Mark E. Law, University of Florida

“For contributions to widely used silicon integrated circuit process modeling”

Dr. Law is Professor and College of Engineering Associate Dean of Academic Affairs for the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Florida. Some of his earlier work related to materials and doping was helpful to the advancement of SOI.

A pretty impressive line-up, don’t you think?  Leaders in the research community are certainly impressed with the work of SOI luminaries. But were you surprised by how many were recognized?  Leave a comment and share your thoughts.

(Photos courtesy IBM, UC Berkeley, Leti, UFlorida)

SOI at IEDM 2010

The 2010 IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) was held December 6-8, 2010 in San Francisco. The IEDM continues to be the world’s premier venue for presenting the latest breakthroughs and the broadest and best technical information in electronic device technologies.

Here are summaries of key papers referencing work on SOI or other advanced substrates.

(Note: at the time of this posting, the papers are not yet available from the  IEEE Xplore website.  However, many are available from the Advanced Silicon Device and Process Lab at the National Taiwan University.)


Paper #1.2: Energy Efficiency Enabled by Power Electronics
Arunjai Mittal (Infineon)

In particular, see section 4, where the author addresses the huge energy savings that can be realized using variable speed motors. Infineon’s driver ICs (which take a logic signal output from a microcontroller chip in the control system, and provide the appropriate current and voltage to turn power devices on and off) are built on SOI. (See Infineon’s article in ASN7. Infineon and LS Industrial Systems started a JV in 2009 called the LS Power Semitech Co., which leverages this technology.)


#2.6: Engineered Substrates and 3D Integration Technology Based on Direct Bonding for Future More Moore and More than Moore Integrated Devices (Invited)

L. Clavelier, C. Deguet, L. Di Cioccio, E. Augendre, A. Brugere, P. Gueguen, Y Le Tiec, H. Moriceau, M. Rabarot, T. Signamarcheix, J. Widiez, O. Faynot, F. Andrieu, O. Weber, C. Le Royer, P. Batude, L. Hutin, J.F. Damlencourt, S. Deleonibus, E. Defaÿ, (CEA/LETI Minatec)

This paper deals with new generations of substrates and 3D integration techniques, based on direct bonding techniques, enabling future devices in the More Moore and in the More than Moore areas.


#3.2 : Planar Fully Depleted SOI Technology: A Powerful Architecture for the 20nm Node and Beyond (Invited)

O. Faynot, F. Andrieu, O. Weber, C. Fenouillet-Béranger, P. Perreau, J. Mazurier, T. Benoist, O. Rozeau, T. Poiroux, M. Vinet, L. Grenouillet, J-P. Noel, N. Posseme, S. Barnola, F. Martin, C. Lapeyre, M. Cassé, X. Garros, M-A. Jaud, O. Thomas, G. Cibrario, L. Tosti, L. Brévard, C. Tabone, P. Gaud, S. Barraud, T. Ernst and S. Deleonibus (CEA/LETI Minatec)

The authors of this paper say that for 20nm node and below, they have proven that planar undoped channel Fully Depleted SOI devices are easier to integrate than bulk, non planar devices like FinFET. The paper gives an overview of the main advantages provided by this technology, as well as the key challenges that need to be addressed.


#3.3:  Anomalous Electron Mobility in Extremely-Thin SOI (ETSOI) Diffusion Layers with SOI Thickness of Less Than 10 nm and High Doping Concentration of Greater Than 1x1018cm-3

N. Kadotani,T. Takahashi, K. Chen,T. Kodera, S. Oda, K. Uchida*  (Tokyo Institute of Technology, *also with PRESTO)

This paper is the first to report carrier transport in heavily doped ETSOI diffusion layers. The authors found that electron mobility in the heavily doped ETSOI diffusion layer is totally different from electron mobility in heavily doped bulk Si. In other words, electron mobility is enhanced in thinner ETSOI diffusion layers (Tsoi>5nm), whereas electron mobility is degraded as dopant concentration increases when Tsoi is 2nm. The authors conclude that this information will be indispensable for the design of aggressively scaled ETSOI devices as well as 3D FETs.


#3.4:  Work-function Engineering in Gate First Technology for Multi-VT Dual-Gate FDSOI CMOS on UTBOX

O. Weber, F. Andrieu, J. Mazurier, M. Cassé, X. Garros, C. Leroux, F. Martin, P. Perreau, C. Fenouillet-Béranger, S. Barnola, R. Gassilloud, C. Arvet*, O. Thomas, J-P. Noel, O. Rozeau, M-A. Jaud, T. Poiroux, D. Lafond, A. Toffoli, F. Allain, C. Tabone, L. Tosti, L. Brévard, P. Lehnen #, U. Weber#, P.K. Baumann#, O. Boissiere#, W. Schwarzenbach+, K. Bourdelle+, B-Y Nguyen+, F. Boeuf*, T. Skotnicki*, and O. Faynot (CEA-LETI Minatec, *STMicroelectronics, #AIXTRON AG, +SOITEC)

For the first time, the authors demonstrate low-VT (VTlin ~± 0.32) nMOS and pMOS adjusted in a gate first FDSOI technology by work-function engineering of TiN/TaAlN metal gates. Especially, for low-VT pMOS, various Chemical-Vapor-Deposited TaAlN stacks with optimized Al concentration have been studied to finely tune the work-function above midgap while maintaining good reliability and mobility. Short channel performance of 500μA/μm ION and 245μA/μm IEFF at 2nA/μm IOFF and VDD=0.9V is reported on pMOS with a TaAlN gate. In addition, it is found that the combination of these two metal gates with either n- or p-doped ground planes below the Ultra-Thin Buried Oxide (BOX) can offer 4 different VT from 0.32V to 0.6V for both nMOS and pMOS.


#8.1: Compact Modeling and Analysis of Coupling Noise Induced by Through-Silicon Vias in 3-D ICs

C. Xu, R. Suaya*, K. Banerjee (UC Santa Barbara, *Mentor Graphics)

This work presents compact models for cases without and with the high conductivity buried layer in dual-well bulk CMOS, which can be employed for keep away radius estimation. A comparative analysis of the coupling noise due to TSV in both dual-well bulk CMOS and PD-SOI is presented. The noise coupling for PD-SOI is much smaller than that of bulk CMOS due to the significantly shorter TSV height compared to that in bulk CMOS.


#8.2:  Large Signal Substrate Modeling in RF SOI Technologies

S. Parthasarathy, B. Swaminathan, A. Sundaram, R.A. Groves, R.L. Wolf, F.G. Anderson (IBM SRDC)

This paper describes a large signal high resistivity (HR) SOI substrate modeling methodology for high power circuit applications such as RF switches.  The authors show that using a varactor to model the BOX capacitor improves the harmonic distortion predictions from simulations for circuits in RF/Analog applications.


#8.5: MuGFET Carrier Mobility and Velocity: Impacts of Fin Aspect Ratio, Orientation and Stress

N. Xu, X. Sun, W. Xiong*, C. R. Cleavelin, T.-J. King Liu (UC Berkeley, *Texas Instruments)

The authors made a detailed study of the impacts of fin aspect ratio and crystalline orientation and process-induced channel stress on the performance of multi-gate transistors. The MuGFETs studied in this work were fabricated on (100) SOI substrates, with either <100> or <110> fin orientation.  They found that CESL-induced stress provides for the greatest enhancement in carrier mobility and ballistic velocity, for n- and p-channel FinFETs and Tri-Gate FET structures. Extracted carrier velocity values in short-channel FinFETs still largely depend on carrier mobility.


#11.1:  Dual Strained Channel Co-Integration into CMOS, RO and SRAM Cells on FDSOI Down to 17nm Gate Length

L. Hutin, C. Le Royer, F. Andrieu, O. Weber, M. Cassé, J.-M. Hartmann, D. Cooper, A. Béché*, L. Brevard, L. Brunet, J. Cluzel, P. Batude, M. Vinet, O. Faynot (CEA LETI Minatec, CEA-INAC)

The authors presented the first successful Dual Strained Channel On Insulator (DSCOI) planar co-integration of tensily strained SOI nFETs and compressively strained SiGeOI pFETs down to 17nm gate length with functional ring oscillators and 6T SRAM cells.  Strained SiGe channels were found to present up to 92% long channel mobility improvement (Eeff=0.6MV/cm); the asset of effective mass reduction is highlighted for short channel pFETs. Moreover, the co-integration with sSOI nFETs leads to well-adjusted Vth,n and Vth,p with a single mid-gap gate for high performance applications, as shown by a 39% improvement of the ring oscillators propagation delay compared to the SOI reference.


#11.2: A Solution for an Ideal Planar Multi-Gates Process for Ultimate CMOS?

S. Monfray, J.-L. Huguenin, M. Martin*, M.-P. Samson, C. Borowiak, C. Arvet, JF. Dalemcourt*, P. Perreau*, S. Barnola*, G. Bidal, S. Denorme, Y. Campidelli, K. Benotmane*, F. Leverd, P. Gouraud, B. Le-Gratiet, C. De-Butet*, L. Pinzelli, R. Beneyton, T. Morel, R.Wacquez*, J. Bustos, B. Icard*, L. Pain*, S. Barraud*, T. Ernst*, F. Boeuf, O. Faynot*, T. Skotnicki (STMicroelectronics, *CEA LETI Minatec)

The authors demonstrate for the first time high-performant planar multi-gates devices integrated on an SOI substrate, with Si-conduction channel of 4nm, allowing drive current up to 1350μA/μm @Ioff=0.4nA/μm. They also demonstrate an ideal planar self-aligned solution, based on the direct exposure of a HSQ layer through a 5nm Si-channel. This opens the way to an easy planar multi-gate process for ultimate CMOS (11nm node & below), fully co-integrable with conventional devices.


#12.1: 32nm High-density High-speed T-RAM Embedded Memory Technology

R. Gupta, F. Nemati, S. Robins, K. Yang, V. Gopalakrishnan, J.J. Sundarraj, R. Chopra, R. Roy, H.-J. Cho*, W.P. Maszara*, N.R. Mohapatra*, J. Wuu**, D. Weiss**, S. Nakib (T-RAM Semiconductor, *GLOBALFOUNDRIES, **AMD)

The authors present Thyristor Random Access Memory (T-RAM) as an ideal candidate for embedded memory due to its substantially better density-performance and logic process compatibility.  T-RAM technology with substantially better density-performance tradeoff  was previously reported was previously reported at the 130nm technology node. This paper is the first to report implementation details in a 32nm HKMG SOI CMOS logic process, with read and write times of 1ns and bit fail rate under 0.5ppm.


#12.3:  A Novel Low-Voltage Biasing Scheme for Double Gate FBC Achieving 5s Retention and 1016 Endurance at 85ºC

Z. Lu, N. Collaert, M. Aoulaiche, B. De Wachter, A. De Keersgieter, W. Schwarzenbach*, O. Bonnin*, K. K. Bourdelle*, B.-Y. Nguyen**, C. Mazure*, L. Altimime, M. Jurczak (IMEC, *SOITEC, **SOITEC-USA)

A novel low-voltage biasing scheme on ultra-thin BOX FDSOI floating body cell is experimentally demonstrated. The new biasing scheme enhances the positive feedback loop. Therefore, the required VDS can be reduced to 1.5V while 5 seconds retention time can still be achieved at 85oC. Endurance up to 1016 cycles is shown.


#16.6: Realizing Super-Steep Subthreshold Slope with Conventional FDSOI CMOS at Low-Bias Voltages (Late News)

Z. Lu*#, N. Collaert*, M. Aoulaiche*, B. De Wachter*, A. De Keersgieter*, J. Fossum#, L. Altimime*, M. Jurczak* (*IMEC, #U. Florida/Gainesville)

The authors report the first experimental demonstration of a super-steep subthreshold slope (the smallest ever reported experimentally) with ultra-thin BOX FDSOI standard CMOS transistors. This work addresses the scaling challenge of continuing to reduce power consumption by lowering operation voltage.  Record steep SS of 72μV/dec for Lg=25nm and 58μV/dec for Lg=55nm are achieved with low voltages. The device also exhibits high ION (~100μA/μm), large ION/IOFF ratio of 108 with 0.5V gate swing for Lg=55nm MOSFETs and excellent reliability.


#18.3: Prospects for MEM Logic Switch Technology (Invited), T.-J. King Liu, J. Jeon, R. Nathanael, H. Kam, V. Pott*, E. Alon (UC Berkeley, *Institute of Microelectronics/Singapore)

This paper provides an overview of recent progress in device design, materials/process integration and technology scaling toward achieving micro-electro-mechanical  (MEM) switches suitable for ultra-low-power digital IC applications.


#27.5: A 0.039um2 High Performance eDRAM Cell Based on 32nm High-K/Metal SOI Technology

N. Butt, K. Mcstay, A. Cestero, H. Ho, W. Kong, S. Fang, R. Krishnan, B. Khan, A. Tessier, W. Davies, S. Lee, Y. Zhang, J. Johnson, S. Rombawa, R. Takalkar, A. Blauberg, K.V. Hawkins, J. Liu, S. Rosenblatt, P. Goyal, S. Gupta, J. Ervin, Z. Li, S. Galis, J. Barth, M. Yin, T. Weaver, J. H. Li, S. Narasimha, P. Parries, W.K. Henson, N. Robson, T. Kirahata, M. Chudzik, E. Maciejewski, P. Agnello, S. Stiffler, and S.S. Iyer (IBM SRDC)

The authors present the industry’s smallest eDRAM cell and the densest embedded memory integrated into the highest performance 32nm High-K Metal Gate SOI based logic technology. With aggressive cell scaling, High-K/Metal trench lowers parasitic resistance while maximizing capacitance. Fully-integrated 32Mb product prototypes demonstrate state-of-the-art sub 1.5ns latency with excellent retention and yield characteristics. The sub 1.5ns latency and 2ns cycle time have been verified with preliminary testing whereas even better performance is expected with further characterization. In addition, the trench capacitors set the industry benchmark for the most efficient decoupling in any 32nm technology.


#34.2:  Strained SiGe and Si FinFETs for High Performance Logic with SiGe/Si Stack on SOI

I. Ok, K. Akarvardar*, S. Lin**, M. Baykan^, C.D. Young, P.Y. Hung, M.P. Rodgers^^, S. Bennett^^, H.O. Stamper^^, D.L. Franca^^, J. Yum#, J.P. Nadeau##, C. Hobbs, P. Kirsch, P. Majhi, R. Jammy (SEMATECH, *GLOBALFOUNDRIES, **UMC, ^U.Florida, ^^CNSE, #U. Texas/ Austin, ##FEI)

The authors have demonstrated high performance p-channel Si/SiGe stacked FinFETs with salient features including 1) high intrinsic mobility; 2) good interface quality without the need for a Si cap between SiGe and High-k; 3) low series resistance; 4) process-induced strain additivity; and 5) a convenient threshold voltage for high performance logic using a midgap metal gate. They also demonstrate a dual channel scheme for high mobility CMOS FinFETs.


#34.3: Understanding of Short-Channel Mobility in Tri-Gate Nanowire MOSFETs and Enhanced Stress Memorization Technique for Performance Improvement

M. Saitoh, Y. Nakabayashi, K. Ota, K. Uchida*, and T. Numata (Toshiba Corp., *Tokyo Institute of Technology)

The authors found that short-channel mobility in SOI nanowire transistors (NW Tr.) is dominated by the strain induced in the NW channel. They enhanced NW strain by the stress memorization technique (SMT). In <110> NW nFETs, Ion on the same DIBL largely increases by SMT thanks to mobility increase and parasitic resistance reduction.  They conclude that stress engineering is highly effective for the performance improvement of scaled NW Tr.


#34.5:  Investigation of Hole Mobility in Gate-All-Around Si Nanowire p-MOSFETs with High-k/Metal-Gate: Effects of Hydrogen Thermal Annealing and Nanowire Shape

P. Hashemi, J.T. Teherani, J.L. Hoyt (MIT Microsystems Technology Laboratories)

The authors present a detailed study of hole mobility for gate-all-around Si NW p-MOSFETs with conformal high-k/MG and various hydrogen annealing processes. The devices are fabricated along the <110> direction on (100) thin body SOI.  Increasing hole mobility is observed with decreasing NW width down to 12 nm. A 33% hole mobility enhancement is achieved relative to universal (100) at high Ninv.


#35.4:  A Quantitative Inquisition into ESD Sensitivity to Strain in Nanoscale CMOS Protection Devices

D.Sarkar, S. Thijs*, D. Linten*, C. Russ**, H. Gossner**, K. Banerjee, (UC Santa Barbara, *IMEC, **Infineon Technologies)

The authors investigated the impact of strain on different ESD protection devices. It is shown for the first time that the ESD sensitivity to strain can vary substantially depending on whether the devices stressed are bulk or SOI and on the mode in which they are stressed.  investigated. SOI NMOS exhibits about 20% improvement in ESD robustness in GG mode. The authors conclude that strain will play an important role in optimization of ESD device robustness of advanced CMOS technologies.

FD-SOI & low power workshop after the IEDM conference

The SOI Industry Consortium, CEA-Leti and Soitec are organizing an evening workshop entitled FD-SOI Readiness at the Hilton Baltimore on Wednesday the 9th of December 2009. The workshop is by invitation, particularly targeting IC makers, foundries, TCAD companies and IP houses. Complementing the technical papers and short courses presented during the IEDM conference, the workshop will be devoted to SRAM scaling, design porting from bulk to FD-SOI, BSIM models, the results of porting an ARM core to SOI, and TCAD with an outlook towards the specificities for FD-SOI. It provides a comprehensive review of the current state of technology presented by renowned experts in the field, and includes plenty of time for discussion and exchanges.

See the Consortium website for details