Tag Archive low-power

ByAdele Hars

GF-Dolphin 22FDX Turnkey Adaptive Body Bias Solutions Offer Big Energy Savings, Faster TTM. Design Kits Q2/19.

GlobalFoundries and Dolphin Integration are collaborating on the development of a series of adaptive body bias (ABB) solutions to improve the energy efficiency and reliability of SoCs on GF’s 22nm FD-SOI (22FDX®) process technology for a wide range of high-growth applications such as 5G, IoT and automotive. The goal of the IP is to accelerate energy-efficient SoC designs and push the boundaries of single-chip integration. The design kits with turnkey ABB solutions will be available starting in Q2 2019.

As part of the collaboration, Dolphin and GF are working together to develop a series of off-the-shelf ABB solutions for accelerating and easing body bias* implementation on SoC designs. ABB is a unique feature of FD-SOI that enables designers to leverage forward and reverse body bias techniques to dynamically compensate for process, supply voltage, temperature (PVT) variations and aging effects to achieve additional performance, power, area and cost improvements beyond those from scaling alone.

The ABB solutions in development by GF and Dolphin consist of self-contained IPs embedding the body bias voltage regulation, PVT and aging monitors and control loop as well as complete design methodologies to fully leverage the benefits of corner tightening. GF says its 22FDX technology offers the industry’s lowest static and dynamic power consumption. With automated transistor body biasing adjustment, Dolphin Integration can achieve up to 7x energy efficiency with power supply as low as 0.4V on 22FDX designs.

“We have been working with GF for more than two years on advanced and configurable power management IPs for low power and energy efficient applications,” said Philippe Berger, CEO of Dolphin Integration. “Through our ongoing collaboration with GF, we are focused on creating turnkey IP solutions that allow designers to realize the full benefit of FD-SOI for any SoC design in 22FDX.”

“In order to simplify our client designs and shorten their time-to-market, GF and our ecosystem partners are helping to pave the way to future performance standards in 5G, IoT and automotive,” said Mark Ireland, vice president of ecosystem partnerships at GF. “With the support of silicon IP providers like Dolphin Integration, new power, performance and reliability design infrastructures will be available to customers to fully leverage the benefits of GF’s 22FDX technology.”

As STMicroelectronics Fellow and Professor Andreia Cathelin has beautifully noted, “Body biasing is not an obligation. It’s an opportunity.” And GF/Dolphin clearly aim to make that opportunity a much easier and more powerful one to take advantage of.

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*A note on terminology: the terms back bias and body bias are used interchangeably. Likewise the terms adaptive and dynamic when used in the FD-SOI context. Here is a quick explanation of how it works, from an ST paper from several years ago:

Back-biasing consists of applying a voltage just under the BOX of target transistors. Doing so changes the electrostatic control of the transistors and shifts their threshold voltage VT, to either get more drive current (hence higher performance) at the expense of increased leakage current (forward back-bias, FBB) or cut leakage current at the expense of reduced performance. While back-bias in planar FD is somewhat similar to body-bias that can be implemented in bulk CMOS technology, it offers a number of key advantages in terms of level and efficiency of the bias that can be applied. Back-biasing can be utilized in a dynamic way, on a block-by-block basis. It can be used to boost performance during the limited periods of time when maximum peak performance is required from that block. It can also be used to cut leakage during the periods of time when limited performance is not an issue. In other words, back-bias offers a new and efficient knob on the speed/power trade-off.

For another good discussion of body biasing in FD-SOI, you might want to check out The Return Of Body Biasing by Semiconductor Engineering’s Ann Steffora Mutschler from a couple years ago.

ByAdele Hars

Chengdu Conference Indicates FD-SOI Will Play Major Role in China/Automotive

FD-SOI was a very important topic during the recent Mount Qingcheng China IC Ecosystem Forum. To situate things, Mount Qingcheng, with its lush hills and waterways, is located just outside of Chengdu. That of course is where GlobalFoundries is building its new fab, which will be the first in China to run FD-SOI. Chengdu is also a key city in China’s automotive electronics landscape.

(Image Courtesy: VeriSilicon)

The theme of the forum was Building a Smart Automotive Electronics Industry Chain. Over 260 decision-makers from government, academia and industry attended – and the SOI Consortium had a significant presence. The event was chaired by Wayne Dai, CEO/Founder of consortium member VeriSilicon, and tireless champion of the the FD-SOI ecosystem in China and worldwide. Morning keynotes were given by: Carlos Mazure, Soitec CTO and SOI Consortium Executive Co-Director; Mark Granger, GF’s VP of Automotive Product Line Management; and Tony King-Smith, Executive Advisor at AImotive, a GF 22FDX customer.

BTW, transcripts of all the talks are available through Gasgoo, China’s largest automotive B2B marketplace. You can click here to access them. (They’re in Chinese – but you can open them in the language of your choice using the major translation websites.)

Chengdu Officials Affirm Support for FD-SOI

Fan Yi, Deputy Mayor of Chengdu, spoke extensively of FD-SOI in his keynote on the importance of rapidly developing smart cars.

He heralded the “spectacular” new GlobalFoundries fab there. Following a meeting with the company’s top brass the day before, he affirmed GF’s confidence in their investment. There is a solid roadmap for FD-SOI, he noted, and efforts are underway to accelerate the move into production and expand education and training. He cited the benefits of FD-SOI for the entire supply chain, from design through package and test, raising the level of the entire IC industry to new heights. The government, he said, attaches great importance to this enterprise. Their thinking regarding intelligent transport in China is integrated with the overall approach to smart cities.

SOI Consortium Leads Industry Keynotes

Wayne Dai, VeriSilicon Founder and CEO (Photo courtesy VeriSilicon)

In his opening remarks, Wayne Dai emphasized the need for China to seize the advantage in the next round of development opportunities in the automotive electronics industry. This year’s Qingcheng forum, he noted, brought together key representatives from across the supply chain, from of the highest to the deepest reaches of the smart car electronics industry, and across markets, technologies, solutions, industrial ecosystem, standards and regulations.

In his talk on how FD-SOI is boosting the accelerated development of automotive electronics, Carlos Mazure presented the SOI Industry Consortium. He noted that the Consortium promotes mutual understanding and development across the ecosystem. SOI is already present throughout automotive applications, he noted. There are currently about 100mm2 of SOI per car, in such diverse areas power systems, transmissions, entertainment, in-vehicle networking and more. SOI will experience especially high growth in electrification, information/entertainment, networking, 5G, AI/edge computing and ADAS. He then went on to give some history and an extensive overview of the major trends and highlights we’ve seen over recent years. He finished by giving examples of convergence across the supply chain with IC manufacturers working with automakers to lower power, increase processor performance and advance 5G.

Carlos Mazure, Soitec CTO and SOI Consortium Executive Co-Director; Tony King-Smith, Executive Advisor at AImotive and Mark Granger, GF’s VP of Automotive Product Line Management (Photo courtesy VeriSilicon)

GF’s Mark Granger addressed the rapid development of automotive electronics. In certain areas, he said, he sees growth rates of over 20%. They are working on building the Chengdu ecosystem, especially for design, and in cooperation with the rest of the supply chain. Furthermore, he reminded the audience, when you talk about cars, travel implies that you also talk about IoT as well as things like infotainment and integrated radar ICs. In addition to cost and power efficiencies, the AEC-Q100 standard for IC reliability in automotive applications is also pushing designers to turn to FD-SOI. In the GF meeting with Chengdu government officials (referenced above in deputy mayor Fan Yi’s talk), he too confirmed their support of FD-SOI as a key technology for China. GF is currently cooperating with about 75 automotive partners, he said, and the company is looking to increase cooperation with partners in the Chengdu region.

Tony King-Smith talked about the 22FDX test chip AImotive is doing with Verisilicon and GF. In case you missed it, in June 2017 AImotive announced its AI-optimized hardware IP was available to global chip manufacturers for license. AiWare is built from the ground up for running neural networks, and the company says it is up to 20 times more power efficient than other leading AI acceleration hardware solutions on the market. In the same announcement, they revealed that VeriSilicon would be the first to integrate aiWare into a chip design,and that aiWare-based test chips would be fabricated on GF’s 22FDX. The chip is expected to debut this year.

While the afternoon agenda was not specific to FD-SOI, it did focus on the “smart cockpit” and “intelligent driving”, with talks by nine leading players in China’s automotive IC and investment communities.

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Note: Many thanks to the folks at VeriSilicon, who wrote up this event for their WeChat feed, and shared photos with us here at ASN.

ByAdele Hars

GF’s FD-SOI Has Delivered >$2 Billion in Design Win Revenues, 50+ Clients

GlobalFoundries has announced that the company’s 22nm FD-SOI (22FDX®) technology has delivered more than two billion dollars of client design win revenue. With more than 50 client designs, 22FDX is being used in power-optimized chips across a broad range of high-growth applications such as automotive, 5G connectivity and IoT.

Their clients chose it for the significant reductions in power and die size relative to a traditional bulk CMOS process, says the company. 22FDX offers the industry’s lowest operating voltage, delivering up to 500MHz frequencies at only 0.4 volts. The technology also delivers efficient single-chip integration of RF, transceiver, baseband, processor, and power management components, “…providing an unparalleled combination of high performance RF and mmWave functionality with low-power, high density logic for devices that require long-lasting battery life, increased processing capability, and connectivity.”

22FDX is in early production, with yields and performance matching client expectations. A recent VLSI Research survey indicated that FD-SOI technology is seen as a complementary technology to FinFET. It’s gaining traction in application spaces such as IoT, where power consumption is important and the product life is relatively short.

“We’re only just beginning,” said GF CEO Tom Caulfied. “We have found a way to separate ourselves from the pack by emphasizing our differentiated FD-SOI roadmap and client-focused offerings that are poised to enable connected intelligence. We will continue to build on our momentum and look for ways to expand our reach to address the evolving needs of the industry.”

Here’s a sampling of customer quotes from the press release (read more here):

  • “At Synaptics, as we expand upon our industry-leading mobile and PC businesses to include delivering new and innovative products that address the booming IoT market, we require the best available technologies to enable us to deliver top-notch solutions including voice and multimedia processing capabilities for our customers,” said the company’s CEO, Rick Bergman. “GF’s 22FDX technology delivers a potent mix of low static and dynamic power along with excellent performance to give us a great platform for our world-class products.”
  • “As our customers increasingly demand more from their mobile experiences, our partnership with GF on its 22FDX technology is critical to differentiate ourselves in the competitive market and deliver powerful and efficient mobile SoCs,” said Rockchip CEO Min Li.
  • “Our goal has always been to provide more secure, connected experiences for drivers. Combining our leadership in radar technology with GF’s 22FDX automotive-qualified process, we are able to deliver a cost-effective, high performance, low power solution that opens new opportunities for car manufacturers to provide better experiences for drivers around the world,” said Kobi Marenko, CEO of Arbe Robotics.
  • “The automotive industry realizes that assisted driving solutions require more camera information besides Radar and Lidar, integrating information from multiple cameras. The resulting DreamChip multi-core vision processor platform, based on the 22FDX process is providing European auto makers and Tier 1 automotive component suppliers with a platform from which they can create custom derivatives with a massively reduced time to market,” said Dream Chip Technologies CEO Jens Benndorf.
  • “With 22FDX, the value proposition for us is the potential power and area savings, two key metrics for our highly optimized LTE NB-IoT and CAT-M chipsets. In addition, leveraging the growing ecosystems of IP available in the 22FDX process helps to accelerate time to market,” said Peter Wong, CEO at Riot Micro, which designs purpose-built silicon for wireless IoT applications. (Read more about that here.)

GF adds that it is preparing to deliver 12FDX™ technology, which will provide a full node scaling benefit and improved power efficiency for a new generation of applications, from edge-node artificial intelligence and AR/VR to 5G networking and ADAS.

ByAdele Hars

Dolphin Showcases New EDA Tool for FD-SOI – More THINGS2DO Results

Dolphin Integration, a partner in the ENIAC THINGS2DO European FD-SOI project, showcased its achievements with PowerStudio™ during the project final review. Power Studio is Dolphin’s cutting-edge EDA tool for safe Power Regulation Networks implementation.

THINGS2DO, which stands for THIN but Great Silicon to Design Objects, was a 4-year, >€120 million EU project (85% industry-funded) with over 40 partners that just finished up at the end of 2017. The goal was to build a design & development ecosystem for FD-SOI. The project funded and supported the development of major FD SOI-based IPs and ASICs as well as EDA tools. (Another recent THINGS2DO announcement was Dream Chips’ ADAS SoC fabbed in GlobalFoundries’ 22FDX technology — read about that here.)

“Being involved in the THINGS2DO project was an opportunity for Dolphin Integration to start introducing FD-SOI in its automatic design methodologies,” said Frederic Poullet, Dolphin Integration’s CTO (read the press release here). “Dolphin Integration plans to offer a full suite of tools allowing its customers to implement right-on-first-pass Power Regulation Networks.”

The company notes that THINGS2DO also proved that low power consumption makes FD-SOI a perfect fit for IoT and automotive applications. For instance, dynamic control of threshold voltage can be used to compensate for temperature variations, and to drive speed improvements by 200% in ultra-low voltage applications.

Dolphin Integration provides energy efficient IPs and ASIC services dedicated to the low-power application market and supports its internal teams with tailor-made software tools. To address the specific needs of its customers in low-power design, Dolphin developed PowerStudio™, a global solution for the optimization of Power Regulation Networks (PRNet) to be used at an early stage of the SoC design process. In particular, it addresses new design challenges in noise and power supply integrity.

The first module of PowerStudio™ will also embed architecture optimization features at the schematic level, in terms of FoM-based cost optimization, mode management, margin cuts and integrability rate-based risk optimization.

Btw, Dolphin Integration Director Frederic Renoux gave an excellent great presentation at an SOI Consortium event in Nanjing, China last year, entitled Embedding power regulation & activity control networks for best SoC PPA.

Dolphin Integration joined Global foundries’ FDXcelerator™ Program last year (read the press release here) to streamline design in 22FDX®. “Our comprehensive and robust library of voltage regulators, power gating cells and logic modules, enables to deal cost-effectively and securely with power distribution, power gating, power monitoring and power control of any SoC design in 22FDX,” Michel Depeyrot, Dolphin Integration’s Chairman, said at the time. “As connected devices sleep most of their time, users of 22FDX also benefit from our ultra-low power and accurate oscillators to design an always-on RTC which consumes as little as 60 nA.”

See the Dolphin Integration website for the full catalog of their IP, EDA and ASIC/SoC service offerings, including for GF’s 22FDX.

ByAdele Hars

ARM Steps Up! And More Good News From Consortium’s FD-SOI Symposium in Silicon Valley

ARM is stepping up its effort to support the FD-SOI ecosystem. “Yes, we’re back,” confirmed Ron Moore, VP of ARM’s physical design group. This and much more good news came out of the recent FD-SOI Symposium organized in Silicon Valley by the SOI Consortium.

The full-day Symposium played to a packed room, and was followed the next day by a full-day design tutorial. Though it was a Silicon Valley event, people flew in from all over the world to be there. (BTW, these symposia and tutorials will also be offered in Japan in June, and Shanghai in the fall). I’ll cover the Silicon Valley FD-SOI design tutorial (which was excellent, btw) in a separate post.

Most of the presentations are now posted on the SOI Consortium website. Here in this ASN post, I’ll touch on some of the highlights of the day. Then in upcoming posts I’ll cover the presentations from Samsung and GlobalFoundries.

ARM Pitches In

If you’re designing in FD-SOI, we’ll help: that was the key message from ARM’s Ron Moore during the panel discussion at the end of the day. Earlier that morning, he’d given an excellent presentation entitled Low-Power IP: Essential Ingredients for IoT Opportunities.

CAGR for most IoT units is roughly 50%, he said, counting home (1.6B units by 2020), city (1.8B), industrial (0.6B) and automotive (1.1B). Compare that to the 2.8B smart phones – which he sees as a remote control and display device. The key differentiator for IoT is that 90% of the time the chip is idle, so you really don’t want leakage.

FD-SOI, he said, gives you a silicon platform that’s highly controllable, enables ultra-low power devices, and is really good with RF.  ARM’s worked with Samsung’s 28FDS FD-SOI offering comparing libraries on bulk and FDSOI, for example, and came up with some impressive figures (see the picture below).

ARM worked with Samsung to compare libraries on 28nm bulk vs 28nm FD-SOI, and came back with these very impressive results. (Courtesy: ARM, SOI Consortium)

The foundry partners and wafer providers are in place. So now ARM is asking about which subsystems are needed to fuel FD-SOI adoption.  Ron recognizes that the ARM IP portal doesn’t yet have anything posted for FD-SOI, but they know they need to do it. He called on the SOI Consortium to help with IoT reference designs and silicon proof points.

In the Q&A, audience member John Chen (VP of Technology and Foundry Management at NVIDIA) asked about FD-SOI and low-cost manufacturing of IoT chips. Moore replied that we should be integrating functionality and charging a premium for IoT chips – this is not about your 25-cent chip, he quipped.

NXP – New Levels in ULP

Geoff Lees, SVP & GM of NXP’s Microcontroller business gave a terrific talk on their new i.MX 7 and 8 chips on 28nm FD-SOI. (And Rick Merritt gave it great coverage in EETimes – see NXP Shows First FD-SOI Chips.)

NXP’s been sampling the i.MX 7 ULP to customers over the last six months, the i.MX 8QM is ramping, and the i.MX 8QXP, 8Q and 8DX are enroute. Each of these chips is optimized for specific applications using biasing.  A majority of the design of each chip is hard re-use, and the subsystems can be lifted and dropped right into the next chip in the series. Power consumption and leakage are a tiny fraction of what they’d had been in previous generations. Ultra low power (aka ULP)  is heading to new levels, he says.

With FD-SOI, it’s easy to optimize at multiple points: in the chip design phase, in the production phase and in the use phase. They can meet a wide range of use cases, precisely targeting for power usage. FD-SOI makes it a win-win: it’s a very cost effective way to work for NXP, plus their customers today need that broader range of functionality from each chip.

Geoff tipped his hat to contributions made here by Professor Boris Murmann of Stanford, who’s driving mixed signal and RF into new areas, enabling high-performance analog and RF integration. (Folks attending the FD-SOI tutorial the next day had the good fortune to learn directly from Professor Murmann.)

Finally, he cited something recently pointed out by Soitec (they’re the SOI wafer folks) Chief Scientist Bich-Yen Nguyen: if half your chip is analog and/or RF, she’s observed, the future is very bright indeed for FD-SOI.

And Much More

Briefly, here are some more highlights.

Synopsys: John Koeter, VP of the Marketing Solutions group showed slides of what they’ve done in terms of IP for Samsung and GlobalFoundries’ FD-SOI offerings.  But there’s a lot they’ve done with partners he couldn’t show because it’s not public. In terms of tools and flows, it’s all straightforward.

Dreamchip:  Designing their new chip in 22nm FD-SOI was 2.5x less expensive than designing it in FinFET would have been, said COO Jens Benndoorf in his presentation, New Computer Vision Processor Chip Design for Automotive ADAS CNN Applications in 22nm FDSOI.  One application for these chips (which taped out in January) will be “digital mirroring”: replacing sideview mirrors with screens. Why hasn’t this been done before? Because LED flickering really messes with sensor readings – but they’ve mastered that with algorithms. The chip will also be used for 360o top view cameras and pedestrian detection.  They’re using Arteris IP for the onchip networking, and implemented forward body bias (FBB).  The reference platform they created for licensing has generated lots of interest in the automotive supply chain, he said.

Dreamchip is using Arteris IP for their ADAS chip in GF’s 22nm FD-SOI (Courtesy: Dreamchip, SOI Consortium)

Greenwaves:  CEO Loic Lietar talked about the high performance, ultra-low power IoT applications processor they’re porting from bulk to FDSOI with a budget of just three million euros.   The RISC-V chip leverages an open source architecture (which he says customers love) and targets smart city, smart factory, security and safety applications. As such, it needs to wake up very fast using just microwatts of power – a perfect match for body biasing in FD-SOI.

 

Greenwaves expects big power savings in their move to FD-SOI. (Courtesy: Greenwaves, SOI Consortium)

Leti: In her talk about roadmaps, CEO Marie-Noelle Semeria said the main two drivers they’re seeing in the move to FD-SOI are #1: low power (a customer making chips for hearing aids can cut power by 8x using body biasing, for example) and #2: RF (with Ft and Fmax performance that “…will be hard for FinFET to achieve”). Leti knows how to pull in all kinds of boosters, and is finding that RF performance is still excellent at the 10/7nm node. They’ve developed a low-power IoT platform with IP available for licensing. Other recent FD-SOI breakthroughs by Leti include: demonstration of a 5G mmW 60GHz transceiver developed with ST; the first 300mm Qbit, opening the door to quantum computing; a photodiode opening the door to a light-controlled SRAM; and a new 3D memory architecture leveraging their CoolCubeTM that they’re working on with Stanford.

IBS: CEO Handel Jones predicts that there “will be war in the year to come” at the 22nm node, as all the big foundries take aim.  FD-SOI is the best technology for RF, ULP and AMS, and there’s a huge market for it. He also said China made the right decision to support FD-SOI, and will come out ahead in 5G.

The day ended with a lively panel discussion (moderated by yours truly) featuring experts from ARM, GF, Invecas, Soitec, Synopsys, Verisilicon and Sankalp.  IP availability was a big theme, but generally there was agreement that while some gaps still exist, they’re being filled:  lack of IP is no longer an issue. Soitec VP Christophe Maleville confirmed that the wafers for FD-SOI are readily available and that they’re seeing excellent yields.

All in all, it was another really good day for FD-SOI in Silicon Valley.

ByAdele Hars

Quick Preview of (Great!) FD-SOI Design Tutorial Day (14 April ’17, Silicon Valley)

Would you like to better understand FDSOI-based chip design? If you’re in Silicon Valley, you’re in luck. On April 14th, the SOI Consortium is organizing a full day of FDSOI tutorials for chip designers. This is not a sales day. This is a learning day.

On the agenda are FD-SOI specific design techniques for: analog and RF integration (millimeter wave to high-speed wireline), ultra-low-power memories and microprocessor architecture, and finally energy-efficient digital and analog-mixed signal processing designs.

The courses will be given by top professors at top universities (including UC Berkeley, Stanford, U. Toronto and Lund). These folks not only know FDSOI inside and out, they’ve all spent many years working closely with industry, so they truly understand the challenges designers face. They’ve helped design real (and impressive) chips, and have stories to tell. (In fact, all of the chips they’ll be presenting were included in CMP’s multiproject wafer runs – click here if you want to see and read about some of them on CMP website.)

The FD-SOI Tutorial Day, which will be held in San Jose, will begin at 8am and run until 3pm. Each professor’s course will last one hour. Click here for registration information.  

(The Tutorial Day follows the day after the annual SOI Silicon Valley Symposium in Santa Clara, which will be held on April 13th.)

Here’s a sneak peak at what the professors will be addressing during the FDSOI Tutorial Day.

FDSOI Short Overview and Advantages for Analog, RF and mmW Design – Andreia Cathelin, Fellow, STMicroelectronics, France

If you know anything about FDSOI, you know ST’s been doing it longer than pretty much than anyone. Professor Cathelin will share her deep experience in designing ground-breaking chips.

Summary slide from Professor Andreia Cathelin’s course at the upcoming FDSOI Tutorial (Courtesy: SOI Consortium and ST)

She’ll start with a short overview of basic FDSOI design techniques and models, as well as the major analog and RF technology features of 28nm FDSOI technology.  Then the focus  shifts to the benefits of FD-SOI technology for analog/RF and millimeter-wave circuits, considering the full advantages of wide-voltage range tuning through body biasing.  For each category of circuits  (analog/RF and mmW), she’ll show concrete design examples such as an analog low-pass  filter and a 60GHz Power Amplifier (an FDSOI-aware evolution of the one featured on the cover of Sedra/Smith’s Microelectronics Circuits 7th edition, which is probably on your bookshelf.) These will highlight the main design features specific to FD-SOI and offer silicon-proof of the resulting performance.

Unique Circuit Topologies and Back-gate Biasing Scheme for RF, Millimeter Wave and Broadband Circuit Design in FDSOI Technologies – Sorin Voinigescu, Professor, University of Toronto, Canada.

Particularly well-known for his work in millimeter wave and high-speed wireline design and modeling (which are central to IoT and 5G), Professor Voinigescu has worked with SOI-based technologies for over a decade. His course will cover how to efficiently use key features of FD-SOI CMOS technology in RF, mmW and broadband fiber-optic SoCs. He’ll first give an overview at the transistor level, presenting the impact of the back-gate bias on the measured I-V, transconductance, fT and fMAX characteristics.  The maximum available power gain (MAG) of FDSOI MOSFETs will be compared with planar bulk CMOS and SiGe BiCMOS transistors through measurements up to 325 GHz.

Summary slide from Professor Sorin Voinigescu’s course at the upcoming FDSOI Tutorial (Courtesy: SOI Consortium and U. Toronto)

Next, he’ll provide design examples including LNA, mixer, switches, CML logic and PA circuit topologies and layouts that make efficient use of the back-gate bias to overcome the limitations associated with the low breakdown voltage of sub-28nm CMOS technologies. Finally, he’ll look at a 60Gb/s large swing driver in 28nm FDSOI CMOS for a large extinction-ratio 44Gb/s SiPh MZM 3D-integrated module, as a practical demonstration of the unique capabilities of FDSOI technologies that cannot be realized in FinFET or planar bulk CMOS.

Design Strategies for ULV memories in 28nm FDS-SOI – Joachim Rodrigues, Professor, Lund University, Sweden

Having started his career as a digital ASIC process lead in the mobile group at Ericsson, Professor Rodrigues has a deep understanding of ultra-low power requirements. His tutorial will examine two different design strategies for ultra-low voltage (ULV) memories in 28nm FD-SOI.

For small storage capacities (below 4kb), he’ll cover the design of standard-cell based memories (SCM), which is based on a custom latch. Trade-offs for area cost, leakage power, access time, and access energy will be examined using different read logic styles. He’ll show how the full custom latch is seamlessly integrated in an RTL-GDSII design flow.

Summary slide from Professor Joachim Rodrigues’ course at the upcoming FDSOI Tutorial (Courtesy: SOI Consortium and Lund U.)

Next, he’ll cover the characteristics of a 28nm FD-SOI 128 kb ULV SRAM, based on a 7T bitcell with a single bitline. He’ll explain how the overall energy efficiency is enhanced by optimizations on all abstraction levels, from bitcell to macro integration. Degraded performance and reliability due to ULV operation is recovered by selectively overdriving the bitline and wordline with a new single-cycle charge-pump. A dedicated sense-amplifierless read architecture with a new address-decoding scheme delivers 90MHz read speed at 300mV, dissipating 8.4 fJ/bit-access. All performance data is silicon-proven.

Energy-Efficient Processors in 28nm FDSOI – Bora Nikolic, Professor, UC Berkeley, USA

Considered by his students at Berkeley as an “awesome” teacher, Professor Nikolic’s research activities include digital, analog and RF integrated circuit design and communications and signal processing systems. An expert in body-biasing, he’s now working on his 8th generation of energy-efficient SOCs. During the FDSOI tutorial, he’ll cover techniques specific to FDSOI design in detail, and present the design of a series of energy-efficient microprocessors. They are based on an open and free Berkeley RISC-V architecture and implement several techniques for operation in a very wide voltage range utilizing 28nm FDSOI. To enable agile dynamic voltage and frequency scaling with high energy efficiency, the designs feature an integrated switched-capacitor DC-DC converter. A custom-designed SRAM-based cache operates in a wide 0.45-1V supply range. Techniques that enable low-voltage SRAM operation include 8T cells, assist techniques and differential read.

Summary slide from Professor Bora Nikolic’s course at the upcoming FDSOI Tutorial (Courtesy: SOI Consortium and UC Berkeley)

Pushing the Envelope in Mixed-Signal Design Using FD-SOI – Boris Murmann, Professor, Stanford University, USA

If you’ve ever attended a talk by Professor Murmann, you know that he’s a really compelling speaker. His research interests are in the area of mixed-signal integrated circuit design, with special emphasis on data converters and sensor interfaces. In this course, he’ll look at how FD-SOI technology blends high integration density with outstanding analog device performance. In same-generation comparisons with bulk, he’ll review the specific advantages that FD-SOI brings to the design of mixed-signal blocks such as data converters and switched-capacitor blocks. Following the review of such general benchmarking data, he’ll show concrete design examples including an ultrasound interface circuit, a mixed-signal compute block, and a mixer-first RF front-end.

Summary slide from Professor Boris Murmann’s course at the upcoming FDSOI Tutorial (Courtesy: SOI Consortium and Stanford U.)

Key Info About the FD-SOI Tutorial Day

  • Event: Designing with FD-SOI Technologies
  • Where: Samsung Semiconductor’s Auditorium “Palace”, San Jose, CA
  • When: April 14th, 2017, 8am to 3pm
  • Cost: $475
  • Organizer: SOI Industry Consortium
  • Pre-registration required – click here to sign up on the SOI Consortium website.

 

ByAdele Hars

NXP’s new i.MX 7ULP On 28nm FD-SOI – Yes! Industry’s Lowest Power General Purpose Applications Processor (part 1)

They’re calling it, “The most advanced, lowest power-consuming GPU-enabled MPU on the market.” It’s NXP’s new i.MX 7ULP general-purpose processor, and it’s on 28nm FD-SOI. They’ve got a nifty video summing it all up – you can watch it here.

NXP is first to market with a general-purpose processor on FD-SOI: the i.MX 7ULP. It’s got both ultra-low power consumption and rich graphics for battery powered applications. (Courtesy: NXP)

With the i.MX 7ULP, NXP is first to market with an FD-SOI applications processor offering the industry’s lowest power consumption. The debut was made at the recent Embedded World Conference in Nuremberg, Germany, and it made a big splash in media across the globe. (Read the full press release here.) In deep sleep mode, it boasts power consumption of just 15 uW or less: 17 times less than previous (and highly successful) low power i.MX 7 devices. Dynamic power efficiency is improved by 50 percent on the real-time domain.

The i.MX 7ULP applications processor family is currently sampling to select customers. Broader availability of pre-production samples is scheduled for Q3 2017.

Hello, IoT!

The high-performance, low-power solution is optimized for customers developing applications that spend a significant amount of time in standby mode with short bursts of performance-intense activity that require exceptional graphics processing. Sounds like IoT – and indeed it is, and more.

With the i.MX 7ULP, NXP’s targeting wearables, portable healthcare, smart home controls, gaming accessories, building automation, general embedded control and IoT edge solutions. Bottom line: it’s designed to enable ultra-low-power and secure, portable applications – especially those demanding long battery life. (Read the current fact sheet here.)

The details

The i.MX 7ULP features an advanced implementation of the ARM® Cortex®-A7 core, the ARM Cortex-M4 core, as well as a 3D and 2D Graphic Processing Units (GPUs). It’s got a 32-bit LPDDR2/LPDDR3 memory interface and a number of other interfaces for connecting peripherals, such as WLAN, Bluetooth, GPS, displays, and camera sensors.

(Courtesy: NXP)

NXP says this new design, based on FD-SOI’s lower voltage capability, enables rich user experience through extremely power-efficient graphics acceleration, a fundamental requirement in many of today’s consumer and industrial battery-operated devices that incorporate robust graphic interfaces. Further enablement includes rich Linux or Android ecosystem with the real-time capability supported by FreeRTOS.

Leveraging body biasing and more

NXP credits the design’s extreme low leakage and operating voltage (Vdd) scalability to that FD-SOI specialty: reverse and forward body biasing (RBB/FBB) of the transistors, and its smart power system architecture.

In presenting the new i.MX 7ULP to the tech press, the company highlighted the following FD-SOI design advantages:

  • Large dynamic gate and body biasing voltage range

  • Domain and subsystem optimization with custom standard cell library with mixed voltages

  • Low quiescent current (Iq) bias generators

  • Enhanced ADC performance with unique FD-SOI attributes

  • Fail Safe I/O for simplified low power system design

To that, add a note about security. As the chip’s fact sheet says, “The processors deliver hardware-enabled security features that enable secure e-commerce, digital rights management (DRM), information encryption secure boot, and tamper detection.” Those are just the sort of things that demand the bursts of high performance that dynamic forward body biasing delivers where and when it’s needed.

Samsung fabs, Verisilicon adds IP

Two other SOI Consortium members – Samsung and Verisilicon – are particularly pleased with NXP’s results.

“We are excited that NXP is the first to bring the benefits of FD-SOI (28FDS) technology to the general purpose market,” says Ryan Lee, VP of the Foundry Marketing Team at Samsung Electronics. “28FDS technology will satisfy a growing and critical need for ultra low power designs that require power-performance at very low voltages. We plan to evolve 28FDS technology to a differentiated low-power single platform by implementing RF and embedded Non-Volatile Memory (eNVM) solution for our customers’ success.”

NXP’s processor design enables robust low power graphics for the IoT and wearable markets through two graphic processor units (GPU) from Vivante: the GC7000 NanoUltra 3D GPU with a low power single shader, and the GC320 Composition Processing Core (CPC) for 2D graphics. The 3D GPU plays a critical role in enabling rich 3D based user interfaces, while the CPC can accelerate both rich 3D and simpler 2D user interfaces. Processors based on the combination of the two GPUs enable efficient display systems which offload and significantly reduce system resources, in turn providing rich user interfaces at low power levels to extend the battery life of devices.

“Our 3D GPU is a result of a joint collaboration between Vivante and NXP to deliver industry-leading 3D capabilities with the lowest power consumption,” said Wei-Jin Dai CEO at Vivante Corporation and Chief Strategy Officer and GM of the IP Division at Verisilicon. “The power savings from using the right GPU in an ultra low power processor is one of the major attributes and advantages of the architecture.”

So, now shall we dig in a little deeper into the “why FD-SOI” question? Read on in Part 2 of this article.

— By Adele Hars, ASN Editor-in-Chief

ByAdele Hars

Part 2: NXP’s new i.MX 7ULP – More on Why It’s On 28nm FD-SOI

i.MX 7ULP (Courtesy: NXP)

As you learned in Part 1 of this article, NXP is calling its new i.MX 7ULP general-purpose processor, “The most advanced, lowest power-consuming GPU-enabled MPU on the market.” Now let’s get into a little more detail about why it’s on 28nm FD-SOI.

If you read NXP VP Ron Martino’s terrific, two-part ASN piece last year on designing the i.MX 7 and 8, you knew this was coming – and you know why they chose to put it on 28nm FD-SOI. (If you missed it then, be sure to read it here now.)

To recap briefly, Ron cited (then expanded upon – so really: read his piece!) the following points that made 28nm FD-SOI the right choice for NXP’s designers:

  • Cost: a move from 28nm HKMG to 14nm FinFET would have entailed up to a 50% cost increase.

  • Dynamic back-biasing: forward body-bias (FBB) improves performance, while reverse body-bias (RBB) reduces leakage (so effectively contributes to power savings). It’s available with FD-SOI (but not with FinFETs), and gets you a very large dynamic operating range.

  • Performance: because body-biasing can be applied dynamically, designers can use it to meet changing workload requirements on the fly. That gets them performance-on-demand to meet the bursty, high-performance needs of running Linux, graphical user interfaces, high-security technologies, as well as wireless stacks or other high-bandwidth data transfers with one or multiple Cortex-A7 cores.

  • Power savings: FD-SOI lets you dramatically lower the supply voltage (Vdd) (so you’re pulling less power from your energy source) and still get good performance.

  • Analog integration: traditionally designers have used specialized techniques to deal with things like gain, matching, variability, noise, power dissipation, and resistance, but FD-SOI makes their job much easier and results in superior analog performance.

  • RF integration: FD-SOI greatly simplifies the integration of RF blocks for WiFi, Bluetooth or Zigbee, for example.

  • Environmental conditions: FD-SOI delivers good power-performance at very low voltages and in a wide range of temperatures.

  • Security: 28nm FD-SOI provides 10 to 100 times better immunity to soft-errors than its bulk counterpart. And FBB delivers the bursts of high performance many security features require.

  • Overall manufacturing risks: FD-SOI is a lower-risk solution. Foundry partner Samsung provided outstanding support, and very quickly reached excellent yield levels.

But in the end, ultra-low power consumption was biggest driver. Joe Yu, VP of low power MPUs at NXP had the following to say about the new i.MX 7ULP. “Power consumption is at the heart of every decision we made for our new applications processor design, which now makes it possible to achieve stunning visual displays and ultra-low power standby modes in a single processor. From the selection of the FD-SOI process and dual GPU architecture, to the heterogeneous processor architecture with independent power domains, every aspect of our new processor design is aimed at providing the best performance and user experience with unprecedented energy efficiency.”

Next up: i.MX 8 for automotive +

At Embedded World, NXP also presented the new i.MX 8X family – and yes, it’s also on 28nm FD-SOI. It’s the first i.MX offering to feature Error Correcting Code (ECC) on the DDR memory interface, combined with reduced soft-error-rate (SER) and increased latch-up immunity, to support industrial Safety Integrity Level 3 (SIL 3). NXP says that opens new opportunities for innovative industrial and automotive applications.

We’ll cover it in an upcoming ASN blog, so stay tuned!

— By Adele Hars, ASN Editor-in-Chief

ByAdele Hars

San Jose Symposium – Part 2 of 2 in an Epic Day for FD-SOI – the “Disruption Enabler” Right Through 7nm

This is part 2 (of 2) of ASN’s coverage of the epic FD-SOI Symposium in San Jose. In part 1 we looked at the exciting developments happening at 28nm (if you missed it, click here to read it now). Here in part 2, we’ll look at 22nm, covering the presentations by GlobalFoundries, ARM, VLSI Research and Sigma Designs. Again, the presentations are now starting to be available on the SOI Consortium website – click here to see them (they’re not all there as of today, though, so keep checking back).

VLSI Research – FD-SOI is Enabler of Disruption

Dan Hutcheson, CEO of VLSI Research, has come around to FD-SOI. His excellent talk, “FD-SOI: Disruptive or Just Another Process” (click here to download it), concluded that FD-SOI is not disruptive – but it’s an enabler of disruption. The disruption is IoT, and it’s going to be a big one. To prepare for his talk, he did an informal survey of designers at a dozen top companies. Here are some of the things he heard:

  • Some companies are using FinFET for some chips and FD-SOI for others, depending on the market they’re targeting – either way, the technologies will co-exist. FinFETs were generally chosen for high-density chips from large companies with lots of money; FD-SOI by those who have time-to-market constraints, are looking to differentiate their products, appreciate the much lower NRE* costs, and that are going for power, reliability and analog advantages.

  • People see a future with FD-SOI – it’s not a one-trick process.

  • The design community is happy to be able to re-use many of their favorite techniques that were lost after the 130nm node.

  • Top target markets for FD-SOI are (by far) IoT, automotive and low-power, followed by analog/mixed-signal, networks, RF, low-end products, mobile, peripherals, MPU/GPU, image sensors and rad-hard.

Here are a couple of his slides that sum up the technical and business reasons people cited as reasons for going to FD-SOI:

(Courtesy: VLSI Research and SOI Consortium)

(Courtesy: VLSI Research and SOI Consortium)

Dan then made a video recapping his San Jose presentation – it’s awesome – click here to see it.

GlobalFoundries – Full House

The ballroom packed right out when GloFo VP Subramani Kengeri took the stage to present, “Enabling Next Generation Semiconductor Product Innovations with 22FDXTM.

The ballroom packed right out when GloFo VP Subramani Kengeri took the stage at the FD-SOI Symposium in San Jose. (photo credit: Adele Hars)

The ballroom packed right out when GloFo VP Subramani Kengeri took the stage at the FD-SOI Symposium in San Jose. (photo credit: Adele Hars)

In terms of energy efficiency, he explained, 0.4V is the minimum energy point for almost any technology – and FD-SOI gets you 0.4V. He then went on to reiterate the features of GloFo’s 22FDXTM Platform, the industry’s first 22nm FD-SOI:

  • Ultra-lower power with 0.4 volt operation

  • Software-controlled transistor body-biasing for innovative performance and power optimization

  • Delivers FinFET-like performance and better energy-efficiency at 28nm-like cost

  • Integrated RF: reduced system cost, and back-gate feature to reduce RF power up to ~50%

  • Integrated eNVM and RF enables lowest cost and smallest form-factor

  • Post-Silicon Tuning/Trimming for Analog/RF, SRAM and Power/Performance optimization

  • Enables innovative applications across mobile, IoT and RF markets

  • 70% lower power than 28HKMG, 20% smaller die than 28nm bulk planar

  • Lower die cost than FinFETs

He then gave lots of technical details (the whole presentation is now available for download from the SOI Consortium website – click here to get it). A key point is that FD-SOI will scale to 7nm. Here’s the slide that says it all:

(Courtesy: GlobalFoundries and SOI Consortium)

(Courtesy: GlobalFoundries and SOI Consortium)

Also, be sure to check out the Cadence presentation when it’s posted – it looks at the solid design methodology now in place.

ARM – now onboard!

Following a brief mea culpa acknowledging that ARM had been missing too long from the FD-SOI table, GM of the Physical Design group Will Abbey made it clear that they are now fully onboard. In his talk, “Realize the Potential of FD-SOI”, he said in comparisons between 22nm FD-SOI and 14nm FinFET, they see a lot of space for FD-SOI. Here’s his summary slide:

(Courtesy: ARM and the SOI Consortium)

(Courtesy: ARM and the SOI Consortium)

They are now looking at ways to further optimize back-biasing to decrease total power in block-level implementations. And yes, he said, you’ll get performance that’s close to FinFET.

Sigma Designs – IoT

Fabless innovator Sigma Designs is focused on the connected home (especially smart TV and media connectivity) and IoT. CEO Thinh Tran presented, “Enabling the Digital Connected World with FDSOI” – you can download it here.

If you really want to optimize for power efficiency, use FD-SOI and run at 0.4V, he advised. “I’m very excited about this,” he told the San Jose audience, adding that, “It’s especially good for RF.” Here’s his slide that explains why:

(Courtesy: Sigma Designs and SOI Consortium)

(Courtesy: Sigma Designs and SOI Consortium)

So, it was a great day in San Jose for 22nm and 28nm FD-SOI. Be sure to keep checking back at the SOI Consortium website, as more presentations will become available in the days to come.

~ ~ ~

*NRE = non-recurring engineering. In a fabless scenario, there are NRE for IP and design (engineering costs, up-front and royalty-based IP costs), NRE for masks and fabrication (mask costs, wafer prototype lots, tools costs, probe cards, load-boards and other one-time capital expenditures), and NRE for qualifications (ESD, latch-up and other industry-specific qualifications, as in automotives).

ByAdele Hars

San Jose Symposium: It Was an Epic Day for FD-SOI – Now Dubbed “The Smart Path to Success” [Part 1 of 2]

The #1 take-away message from the recent FD-SOI Symposium in San Jose is that “FD-SOI is the smart path to success”. With presentations echoing that theme by virtually all the major players – including (finally!) ARM – to a packed house, it really was an epic day for the FD-SOI ecosystem. The presentations are now starting to be available on the SOI Consortium website – click here to see them (they’re not all there as of today, though, so keep checking back).

Since there’s so much to cover, we’ll break this into two parts. This is Part 1, focusing on presentations related to some of the exciting products that are hitting the market using 28nm FD-SOI. Part 2 will focus on the terrific presentations related to 22nm FD-SOI. In future posts we’ll get into the details of many of the presentations. But for now, we’ll just hit the highlights.

So back briefly to FD-SOI being smart. (A nice echo to the Soitec FD-SOI wafer manufacturing technology – SmartCutTM – that make it all possible right?) It started with the CEO of Sigma Designs (watch for their first IoT products on FD-SOI coming out soon) quipping, “FD-SOI is the poor man’s FinFET.” To which GlobalFoundries’ VP Kengeri riffed that really, “FD-SOI is the smart man’s FinFET”. And NXP VP Ron Martino, summed it up saying, “FD-SOI is the smart man’s path to success”. Yes!

Samsung – in 28FDS mass production

Samsung now has a strong 28nm FD-SOI tape-out pipeline for 2016, and interest is rising fast, said Kelvin Low, the company’s Sr. Director of Foundry Marketing. His presentation title said it all: “28FDS – Industry’s First Mass-Produced FDSOI Technology for IoT Era, with Single Platform Benefits.” They’ve already done 12 tape-outs, are working on 10 more now for various applications: application processor, networking, STB, game, connectivity,…., and see more coming up fast and for more applications such as MCU, programmable logic, IoT and broader automotive. It is a mature technology, he emphasized, and not a niche technology. The ecosystem is growing, and there’s lots more IP ready. 28nm will be a long-lived node. Here’s the slide that summed up the current production status:

Samsung_FDSOI_productionstatus_SanJose16c

Samsung’s foundry began commercial production of 28nm FD-SOI in 1Q2016.

ST_FDSOI_analog_SanJose16c

At the San Jose symposium, ST showed once again the enormous advantages FD-SOI provides in analog design.

As you see, the production PDK with the RF add-on will be available this summer. Also, don’t miss the presentations by Synopsys (get it here), which has repackaged the key IP from ST for Samsung customers, Leti on back-bias (get it here), Ciena (they were the Nortel’s optical networking group) and ST (it’s chalk-full of great data on FD-SOI for RF and analog).

NXP – integration, differentiation and passion

Ron Martino gave a talk full of energy and passion entitled, “Smart Technology Choices and Leadership Application Processors,” (which you can download from the SOI Consortium website – click here).

If you read Ṙon’s terrific posts here on ASN recently, you already know a lot about where he’s coming from. If you missed them, they are absolute must-reads: here’s Part 1 and here’s Part 2. Really – read them as soon as you’re done reading this.

As he noted in his ASN pieces, NXP’s got two important new applications processor lines coming out on 28nm FD-SOI. The latest i.MX 7 series combines ultra-low power (where they’re dynamically leveraging the full range of reverse back biasing – something you can do only with FD-SOI on thin BOX) and performance-on-demand architecture (boosted when and where it’s needed with forward back-biasing). It’s the first general purpose microprocessor family in the industry’s to incorporate both the ARM® Cortex®-A7 and the ARM Cortex-M4 cores (the series includes single and dual A7 core options). The i.MX 8 series targets highly-advanced driver information systems and other multimedia intensive embedded applications. It leverages ARM’s V8-A 64-bit architecture in a 10+ core complex that includes blocks of Cortex-A72s and Cortex-A53s.

In his San Jose presentation, Ron said that FD-SOI is all about smart architecture, integration and differentiating techniques for power efficiency and performance. And the markets for NXP’s i.MX applications processors are all about diversification, in which a significant set of building blocks will be on-chip. The IoT concept requires integration of diverse components, he said, meaning that a different set of attributes will now be leading to success. “28nm FD-SOI offers advantages that allows scaling from small power efficient processors to high performance safety critical processor,” he noted – a key part of the NXP strategy. Why not FinFET? Among other things, it would bump up the cost by 50%. Here are other parts of the comparison he showed:

(Courtesy: NXP and SOI Consortium)

(Courtesy: NXP and SOI Consortium)

For NXP, FD-SOI provides the ideal path, leading to extensions of microcontrollers with advanced memory. FD-SOI improves SER* by up to 100x, so it’s an especially good choice when it comes to automotive security. Back-biasing – another big plus – he calls it “critical and compelling”. The icing on the cake? “There’s so much we can do with analog and memory,” he said. “Our engineers are so excited!”

Sony – GPS (with 1/10th the power!) now sampling

You know how using mapping apps on your smartphone kills your battery? Well now there’s hope. Sony’s getting some super impressive results with their new GPS using 28nm FD-SOI technology. These GPS are operated at 0.6V, and cut power to 10x (!) less than what it was in the previous generation (which was already boasting the industry’s lowest power consumption when it was announced back in 2013).

In San Jose, Sony Senior Manager Kenichi Nakano presented, “Low Power GPS design with RF circuit by the FDSOI 28nm”, proclaiming with a smile, “I love FD-SOI, too!” All the tests are good and the chip is production ready, he said. In fact, they’ve been shipping samples since March.

As of this writing, his presentation is not yet posted. But til it is, if you’re interested in the background of this chip, you can check out the presentation he gave in Tokyo in 2015 here.

Analog Bits – Lowest Power SERDES IP

SERDES (Serializer/Deserializer) IP is central to many modern SOC designs, providing a high-speed interface for a broad range of applications from storage to display. It’s also used in high-speed data communications, where it’s had a bad rep for pulling a huge amount of power in data centers. But Analog Bits has been revolutionizing SERDES IP by drastically cutting the power. Now, with a port to 28nm FD-SOI, they’re claiming the industry’s lowest power.

AnalogBits_FDSOI_Serdes_SanJose16

With the port to 28nm FD-SOI, Analog Bits now has the industry’s lowest power SERDES.

In his presentation, “A Case Study of Half Power SERDES in FDSOI”, EVP Mahesh Tirupattur described FD-SOI as a new canvas for chip design engineers. The company designs parts for multiple markets and multiple protocols. When they got a request to port from bulk to 28nm FD-SOI, they did it in record time of just a few months, getting power down to 1/3 with no extra mask steps. Plus, they found designing in FD-SOI to be cheaper and easier than FinFET, which of course implies a faster time to market. “The fabs were very helpful,” he said. “I’m pleased and honored to be part of this ecosystem.”

Stanford – FD-SOI for the Fog

Listening to a presentation by Stanford professor Boris Murmann gets you a stunning 30,000 foot view of the industry through an amazing analog lens. He’s lead numerous explorations into the far reaches of analog and RF in FD-SOI, and concludes that the technology offers significant benefits toward addressing the needs of: ultra low-power “fog” computing for IoT (it’s the next big thing – see a good Forbes article on it here); densely integrated, low-power analog interfaces; universal radios; and ultra high-speed ADC. Get his symposium presentation, “Mixed-Signal Design Innovations in FD-SOI Technology” here.

So, it was a great day in San Jose for 28nm FD-SOI. Next in part 2, we’ll look at why it was also an epic day for 22nm FD-SOI. Be sure to keep checking back at the SOI Consortium website, as more presentations will become available in the days to come.

~ ~ ~

*SER = Soft Error Rates – soft errors occur when alpha or neutron particles hit memory cells and change their state, giving an incorrect read. These particles can either come from cosmic rays, or when radioactive atoms are released into the chips as materials decay.