Category Archive Advanced Substrate Corners

€103M OCEAN12 Project for Automotive/Aeronautic FD-SOI in Europe (Interview)

ASN had a chance to talk to François Brunier of Soitec, who’s leading this important project.

Advanced Substrate News (ASN): Can you tell us briefly about OCEAN12?

Francois Brunier (FB): OCEAN12 stands for Opportunity to Carry European Autonomous driviNg further with FD-SOI technology up to the 12nm node.

Francois Brunier, Partnership Program Manager, Soitec.

OCEAN12 deals with “Ultra-low power computing solutions for automotive and aeronautics using all the range of FDSOI technologies”. This project with a budget of 103M€ brings together 27 partners from 7 different countries. The project received the ECSEL JU* label under the 2017 call.  ECSEL is an EU-driven public-private partnership enabling the co-financing of innovation in electronic components and systems both by Member States and the European Union.

ASN: Why is this project needed?

FB: As of today a car has around 500 million transistors. These electronic components represent already an important vector of valorization and differentiation for the automotive industry and for the consumer. The increased autonomy of the vehicles will require a very strong build-up of computational capacities. 50 to 100 times more transistors could be required for a level 5 (fully autonomous car). Following this trend an autonomous car will require power consumption equivalent to 50 to 100 computers running continuously (without taking into account the car propulsion).

The OCEAN12 partners.

The power consumption of these components becomes a key element in the choice of technologies. We believe that our technologies on SOI present the best assets to meet this challenge.

The FD-SOI substrates, technologies and designs developed in OCEAN12 offer a palate of different solutions to this challenge: increased performance for data processing (including Artificial Intelligence); much higher energetic efficiency; and smaller form factors to fit in embedded systems like autonomous cars with higher integration and reliability, and enabling safe connectivity.

The OCEAN12 project will demonstrate that SOI technologies are able to meet these challenges through relevant demonstrators in the targeted fields.

ASN: What are the project goals?

FB: OCEAN12 will bring concrete solutions to the main challenges of smart connectivity and low power consumption in the automotive industry.

As such, OCEAN12 will build awareness around the key enabling technologies in substrate development, transistor behavior, and the design and fabrication of integrated circuits up to the system and end-user application levels. We will show that the technology is advantageous for automotive and aerospace applications, which are strategic sectors for Europe. Having the whole supply chain in Europe means having trusted and secured components made in Europe.

The OCEAN12 project goals stand on three pillars:

First: Confirming the technology foundation. Ocean12 puts the FD-SOI substrate and device developers in direct contact with the full value chain of suppliers and end users. This gives the entire ecosystem visibility into current and future needs, and ensures that substrate and device solutions are both technically feasible and correctly aligned with actual system requirements.

Second: Creating concrete, innovative demonstrators in automotive (Audi, Bosch) and aeronautics (Airbus, Thales). These demonstrators are a first step in defining the context and environment to prove the advantages of these technologies in real application cases, showing they are useful and as such prefigure a final system and a potential future product roadmap. Demonstrators should be as close as possible to the final application.

Third: Broadening the design ecosystem, with the big companies, the small- and medium-sized companies (SMEs) and the research organizations (universities, RTOs). We have a critical mass of 16 design ecosystem partners focusing their efforts on FD-SOI. The project leverages that dynamic FD-SOI design ecosystem for IC product migration to FD-SOI and the creation of new IP. Inventing the future components in Europe is also key.

ASN: Can you tell us more about the demonstrators? When will we see them?

FB: There are four demonstrators. All these demonstrators will be delivered by the end of the project in 2021:

Always-on wake-up systems (Audi, Bosch, Leti). With such a system we can imagine an application to monitor our car when it is parked in a parking lot for a long time. The sensors would remain aware of everything that goes on around the car. Based on sensor observations, the car can make decisions on further actions to take. This can be used in many future car applications like intrusion detection or vehicle access systems. But you will not have to worry about battery drain: even though all the sensors are always on, they go right back into a very low-power sleep mode thanks to FD-SOI technology.

mm-Wave integrated radar SOCs (Bosch and Audi), which will benefit from all the innovations of FD-SOI thanks to its low consumption properties, but also the optimization of the sensors. The performance gain is made over the entire system with adaptations between analog and logic.

High-performance video processor for aeronautics. (Airbus, Thales, Kalray). Kalray, a French SME working on Massively Parallel Processor Arrays (MPPA) aims to demonstrate an ultra-low power, low-cost, high-performance neural processor on FD-SOI technology. This demonstrator would be key for Airbus and drones with high-performance, low-power cameras. Airbus and Audi have partnered on air and ground mobility services.

Microcontroller plug-and-play board. This demonstrator lead by ST will allow for the development of new solutions in the domain of GNSS/GPS.

ASN: Can you tell us more about the partners?

FB: The OCEAN12 consortium of 27 partners involves 8 large groups, 9 SMEs and 10 universities/RTOs. These partners come from 7 different European countries.

The eight large groups include: Soitec, the world’s leading provider of FD-SOI substrates; EVG, a leading global equipment supplier; GlobalFoundries and STMicroelectronics, the two major European FD-SOI foundries; and Bosch, as a Tier 1 automotive supplier. At the top of the value chain, high-end European automotive manufacturer Audi, the avionics industrial giant Airbus, and Thales for security issues, will develop product demonstrations.

Ten highest-level research institutes support the industrial consortium. They include CEA-Leti (FR), Fraunhofer(GE), IMS (FR), INP Grenoble (FR), TU Dresden (GE), U. Paderborn (GE), Bundeswehr U. Munich (GE), Eberhard Karls U. Tübingen (GE), Instituto de Telecomunicações (PT), and Warsaw UT (PL). They increase the competitiveness through technological innovation and transfer of technical know-how while gaining new expertise working with global leaders.

In addition, OCEAN 12 has a very strong SME consortium covering the supply chain in the fields of new equipment, IP, system integration and fabless companies. They include: IBSUnitySC (HSEB), MunEDAKalrayAED EngineeringISD, EVOTEL, M3 Systems and Design&Reuse.

All these partners have longstanding experience of cooperation in various national and international frameworks and are specialists in their fields of activity. Their contributions are essential for the success of the project.

ASN: What is the timetable?

The OCEAN12 kick-off event at Soitec’s headquarters near Grenoble.

FB: The project started on April 1st 2018. The kick off with all the partners was held at Soitec on 29 September 2018. It was a great success. The project runs through December 2021, by which point everything has to be demonstrated.

ASN: Can you clarify the funding structure?

FB: The budget is about €103.6M. If the project succeeds, we get European Commission funding. In that case, just over 20% of the eligible cost – about €23M – is subsidized at the European level. The seven countries with companies or organizations participating in the project will then roughly match the European subsidies, contributing about €27M.

These ECSEL-type public-private projects are a tried and true model in Europe, maximizing synergy across ecosystems.

To conclude, in the name of the consortium I’d like to thank the ECSEL JU, the European Commission and our National Funding Agencies from France (DGE), Germany, Portugal, Greece, Spain, Austria and Poland. Such a project would not exist without them.

______

*ECSEL JU: Electronic Components and Systems for European Leadership Joint Undertaking

Renesas’ New FD-SOI (SOTB) MCU for Energy Harvesting Applications (eenews)

Renesas, one of the world’s very top MCU manufacturers, is heralding its new FD-SOI based R7F0E017 for energy harvesting applications. In an in-depth article in the May 2019 edition of EENews Embedded, Renesas Product Marketing Manager Graeme Clark detailed the new chip, which is sampling this year. It’s a fascinating read, with lots of explanations about how SOI enables the cutting-edge features (like an integrated energy harvesting controller) – you won’t want to miss it.

BTW, here at ASN we’ve been covering the origins of this technology since 2005.They call it SOTB, for Silicon On Thin Box, but it is indeed their flavor of FD-SOI. The work started at Hitachi in cooperation with Renesas with a paper that debuted at IEDM 2004, then moved along through the series of mergers that resulted in the offering at what is Renesas Electronics today.

Here are some key quotes from the article:

The new SOTB process can now offer active mode current of less than 20 µA/MHz and leakage currents down to 150 nA, while still allowing the development of devices with reasonably high clock rates, large embedded flash memories and SRAMs on chip. This combination of integration and power consumption will make devices developed on this process ideal for energy harvesting applications. The result of this new process is that we can develop a new generation of microcontroller products.”

The use of the Silicon on Thin Buried Oxide technology on this new device has resulted in some unique low power characteristics. The first device has the following features and future devices using this process could offer even lower power consumption.

  • Active current of 20 µA /MHz
  • Standby Current of 200 nA
  • ADC operation 3 µA @ 32 kHz
  • 256 Kbyte SRAM with 1 nA / Kbyte standby current”

The R7F0E017 is able to run safely from a pure energy harvesting power source due to the operation of the Energy Harvesting Controller. The device can operate from a wide range of potential energy sources including solar power, vibration, pressure and temperature difference, and many others. The integrated energy harvesting controller, supported by very few inexpensive external components, completely manages the cyclic wake-up sequence of the microcontroller, only using the extremely low energy harvesting source current.”

Click here to read the full article on the eenewseurope website.

SOI Consortium Events Around the World This Fall – Mark Your Calendars

2019 will be a busy fall for the SOI Consortium and our members.

First off are the SOI Consortium events in Shanghai and Tokyo, which are very popular indeed. We now have the dates & locations locked in, so you’ll want to mark your calendars:

The SOI Consortium and members will also be giving talks at Semicon Europa, which is being held 13 – 15 November 2019 in Munich, Germany.

The programs are currently being finalized. As soon as they’re ready, we’ll be sure to let you know so you can register and/or share the news with your colleagues and clients. But in the meantime, make sure you save the dates.

Would you like to check out the presentations given at Consortium events in previous years? If you hover your cursor over the Events tab at the top of our home page, you’ll get a drop-down menu of events for the last five years (we’re working on adding more – we’ve been doing these events for over a decade!). Click through to any past event and you’ll land on a page where you can download most of the presentations that were given there. Of if you’re looking for past presentations given by any particular company, use the search engine at the bottom of any page on our website.

S3S

You’ll also find many of our members at the IEEE/EDS S3S Conference in San Jose, CA, October 14 – 19th. S3S (formerly known as The SOI Conference) has been running in various forms for over 30 years. They always have an excellent line-up of speakers, plus it’s a great opportunity for networking with researchers from across the worldwide SOI ecosystem. BTW, while the deadline for general paper selection has already closed, papers of exceptional merit are currently being accepted for their Late News Sessions. See the 2019 Call for Papers for more information – those Late News papers need to be received by 23 August 2019 for consideration.

Also, IEEE S3S Conference will once again host a full-day short course and a half day tutorial. These are very popular. The short course this year will be on SOI Design and Technology for Analog and Mixed Signal. As of this writing, the program is still being finalized, but more will be announced in the next few weeks, so check back on their website soon for updated information.

Member Events

And finally, don’t forget to learn more about the offerings from and in support of the SOI ecosystem at our members’ events around the globe, including:

GlobalFoundries – GTC | Samsung Foundry – SFF | ST – Technology Tour | Synopsys – SNUG | Cadence – CDNLive | Silvaco – SURGE | Arm – TechCon | NXP – Tech Days | Leti – Events | imec –Events |

SOI Consortium & Ecosystem Shines at SOI Academy (Shanghai) & WCS (Nanjing)

The SOI Consortium and member companies had a significant presence at two important events in China recently: the World Semiconductor Congress (WCS) in Nanjing and the SOI Academy, including an FD-SOI Training Day in Shanghai.

Nanjing is especially known as a leading RF chip design hub in China, but WCS went well beyond RF. The three-day 2019 event was held at the Nanjing International Expo Center. It attracted over 30,000 visitors, 5000 of whom attended the various summit forums.

Presenting at WCS ’19 in Nanjing (clockwise from top left): Wayne Dai, CEO/Founder, VeriSilicon; Carlos Mazure, Executive Director, SOI Consortium; Giorgio Cesana, Director, STMicroelectronics; Christophe Tretz, Design Expert, SOI Consortium.
(Photos courtesy: WCS)

The SOI Consortium organized the SOI Forum, which was part of an afternoon Innovation Summit. Presentations were given by members of the SOI Consortium team, and by leaders from our membership, including Simgui, NXP, Incize, ST, IBM, Cadence and Xpeedic. Some of those presentations are now available from our website — click here to get them.

Earlier in the day, SOI Consortium member VeriSilicon participated in a morning session on AI and IoT Wireless Communications. They presented their low-power Bluetooth design platform for GlobalFoundries 22FDX, and CEO Wayne Dai moderated a lively round-table discussion.

Following hard on the heels of the Nanjing event, the SOI Consortium team and members headed to Shanghai for the SOI Academy 2019, hosted for the second year in a row by member SIMIT (Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and IT under the Chinese Academy of Sciences). The two-day event attracted more than 250 professionals from more than 100 domestic and foreign IC companies and research institutes.

Keynotes by SOI Consortium Executive Director Carlos Mazure, SITRI CEO Mark Ding and Jean-Eric Michallet, Head of the Microelectronics Components Department at Leti and bizdev director for the SOI Consortium focused on the SOI ecosystem. The SITRI and Leti talks also gave updates on their research and industrialization alliance. Further talks were given by leaders from Soitec, GlobalFoundries, VeriSilicon, IBM and Xpeedic. These addressed the growing FD-SOI ecosystem, applications in automotive electronics, 22 nm and 10 nm FD-SOI devices, advanced SOI substrate technology, China’s FD-SOI development, the FD-SOI manufacturing process, product design, EDA tools and all aspects of industry’s software and modeling value chain.

Several speakers noted that more and more local Chinese customers are actively adopting FD-SOI for low-power, high-performance chips.

SOI Academy, Shanghai, 2019, FD-SOI Training Day attendees.
(Photo credit: SIMIT)

The second day was devoted to hands-on professional training, given by experts from Leti using an actual PDK and punctuated by in-depth discussions. This helped the IC designers to fully understand the advantages and flexibility of FD-SOI in low-power logic, analog/mixed-signal and RF.

All in all, “It was a great success,” concluded Jean-Eric MICHALLET, Head of the Microelectronics Components Department at Leti and bizdev director for the SOI Consortium. Plans for the next SOI Academy are already underway, with plans to extend the topics to include more on photonics, RF, power and MEMS.

SiV SOI Symposium Part 3 – Final FD-SOI Takeaways

Why FD-SOI? What can you do with it that you couldn’t do before? That was the big question from IHS Markit’s Matthew Short that kicked off the first panel discussion at the SOI Consortium’s Silicon Valley Symposium. And there were some great answers.

VeriSilicon, Analog Bits and Silicon Catalyst were among the consortium members with stands at the SOI Symposium, Silicon Valley 2019.

Here in this final part of our coverage of the event, we’ll detail who said what in the two panel discussions, as well as the presentations by Leti, Intento Design & the SOI Consortium’s IP/EDA roundup.

If you missed the previous two installments of our coverage, you can catch up on the rest of the presentations in part 1 (NXP, Samsung & more) here and part 2 here (Synaptics, GlobalFoundries & more). Almost all of the presentations are now freely available under “events” on the consortium website – or just click here to get them.

How FD-SOI Changes What You Can Do

The presentation by Matthew Short, Sr. Director of IoT Technology at IHS Markit, was not specific to SOI, but it sure did lay out out the market opportunities.  Entitled IoT, 5G, ADAS and AI Market, it’s available on our website. Matt spent most of his career in chip design at NXP/Freescale, so he really has an engineer’s perspective on where this all is going.  At IHS Markit, they define IoT as anything with an IP address. Over the past year more than 10 billion devices were shipped, and there were more “things” than cellular handsets, so the world has really changed. He outlined the growth drivers, suggested that 5G won’t be a “wow” thing for consumers, and noted there is a lot of debate raging regarding how smart sensors should be (the Tier 1’s want smart).

He was then joined on the stage by the participants in the first panel discussion, which looked at product and application drivers. That included: NXP Fellow Rob Cosaro; Tim Dry, Director of Edge & Endpoints Marketing at Samsung Foundry; ST biz dev director Roger Forchhammer; CoreAVI biz dev VP Lee Melatti; Nokia VP Michael Reiha; and Analog Bits EVP Mahesh Tirupattur.

First Short asked why customers wanted more integrated solutions. For CoreAvi, it’s about safety, for ST in automotive it’s about security, for Analog Bits, it’s about integrating more analog, for Nokia it’s just a necessity.

Then he asked Why FD-SOI? What can you do that you couldn’t do before? For ST, which is doing MCUs for automotive, it’s about energy efficiency, speed, the density of non-volatile memory and the robustness of the technology. For NXP, it’s back biasing, low voltage and power numbers never seen before. “FD-SOI really makes a difference in the products we can bring to market,” said Cosaro. For CoreAVI, it’s the long-term power impact. And for Analog Bits, “Customers see huge benefits,” said Tirupattur, for cost sensitive applications. He has customers selling their technology in high volumes in FD-SOI.

What about edge vs. cloud?  For Nokia, it’s monolithic integration for best-in-class RF, advanced memory, biasing and voltage regulation adding a layer of intelligence. Samsung sees edge as distributed cloud, and CoreAVI sees safety in the edge, because you can’t completely rely on the cloud.

Where are the weak points in the FD-SOI ecosystem? For Samsung, more people need to use back biasing. “People need to use the knobs,” said Dry. For Analog Bits, the next step is innovation around back biasing, as many in logic don’t understand the benefits, so the ecosystem needs to promote the value proposition. ST suggests that with more products out there, customers will see the benefits. NXP did “a lot of the heavy lifting” at 28nm – now you need more people using these nodes, not just the cellphone nodes.

How will the architecture change? For NXP, it’s all about memory bandwidth. For Samsung, it’s the promise of analog and interconnect. Nokia sees the back-end and heterogeneous integration with FD-SOI and RF enablement. Analog Bits’ Tirupattur said he’s pushing his engineers for even lower power in a still smaller form factor, noting that most analog engineers had been more focused on performance than power, but now that’s changed.  For ST, it’s AI/ML throughout automotive, and FD-SOI is beneficial there.

Leti & the Connected Car

Leti’s slide 27, SOI Symposium, Silicon Valley 2019

Research giant Leti’s presentation was entitled Applications Around the Connected Car. 85% of Leti’s €315M budget comes from R&D contracts with its 350 industrial partners. Truly a driving force in FD-SOI, Leti is involved in a dizzying array of projects. For the connected car, they cover (much of it on SOI): high precision & smart sensing, embedded processing & fusion, new computing paradigms and deep learning, ultra-low power computing nodes & framework, ultra-low power connectivity for IoT, energy management and scavenging, and security. They do vision at the edge, 3D technology for smart imagers, and ways to dramatically reduce power. They’ve got a Qbits platform on FD-SOI for AI at the edge, a super low power neural network accelerator, and ULP connectivity. Check out the presentation for lots of details.

EDA/IP Overview

Slide 9 from SOI EDA/IP Overview.

SOI Consortium Executive Co-Director Jon Cheek gave a quick round-up presentation aggregating various IP and EDA offerings entitled , SOI EDA/IP Overview. It is taken from recent member presentations including Cadence, Silvaco, VeriSilicon, Synopsys and GlobalFoundries, giving you an idea of how dynamic the ecosystem has become.

Automating Analog

While the logic side of the design equation has long had robust automation tools, some consider the analog side as sort of black magic. New consortium member Intento Design aims to fix that. Here at ASN we covered their work with ST briefly a few months ago here.  At the SOI Symposium, the company’s CEO Dr. Ramy ISKANDER presented their solution in ID-XploreTM: A Disruptive EDA for Emerging FDSOI Applications. Intento, a partner in GlobalFoundries FDXcelerator program, has cognitive software for first-time right analog design. It determines the appropriate static and dynamic body biasing ranges to meet PVTB (Process/Voltage/Temperature/Body Bias), and is fully integrated into the Cadence Environment. They produced multiple correct-by-construction FD-SOI designs, and the total time spent to generate eight candidates FD-SOI designs took less than a day.  

The Tools Are in the Box

The last panel discussion, entitled Are the Tools in the Box? was moderated by the Consortium’s Jon Cheek. Participants included: VeriSilicon SVP David Jarmon; Arm PDG Marketing VP Kelvin Low; NXP’s Stefano Pietri, Technical Director of the company’s Microcontrollers Analog Design Team; Jamie Schaeffer, who’s GF’s Sr. Product Offering Manager for 22FDX and 12FDX; and Cadence Strategic Alliances Director Jonathan Smith.

2nd panel discussion, SOI Symposium, Silicon Valley 2019

Yes, the tools are in the box. Smith of Cadence said they’re providing them, and NXP’s Pietro said that they’re very well positioned in his specialty, analog. VeriSilicon has IP, and anything they don’t have in house they’ll license. 

So why be afraid of body biasing? NXP has proof by example – they see such huge cost advantages that they try to leverage it as much as possible. GF’s doing training, since each area (automotive, IoT, etc.) has different needs. Some VeriSilicon customers already see such substantial benefits from FD-SOI that they’re not bothering to do biasing. Cadence points out that the Arm POP announcement is huge, and Arm’s Low wondered if the SOI Consortium could do an IP portal?  “Our sales departments need to explain the advantages to our customers!” said NXP’s Pietro.

From the audience, NXP VP & longtime FD-SOI proponent Ron Martino (who, btw, wrote some great articles for ASN when they first got into FD-SOI – read them here), asked why designers think FD-SOI means a lot of corners? How do we convince the industry that FD-SOI simplifies design? Cadence is working with GF, responded Smith, and will have some big new at Arm’s TechCon this fall. “We need more training and marketing to show it’s not scary,” he added. For GF, the corners don’t get more complicated, and they’re working with Dolphin Integration on getting them covered early in the planning. Ease of access to IP will help, per Arm.

And in a great concluding remark, VeriSilicon’s Jarmon said, “The craft is being automated. The more we work together, the greater success of FD-SOI.”

Part 2: Silicon Valley SOI Symposium Takeaways. FD-SOI, Smarter Edge, Goldilocks & More.

Key takeaway #2: If you need a Goldilocks process node – where you’ll get just the right balance between active power, unit cost and investment – look to FD-SOI. And, btw, the IP landscape has improved dramatically. Those were just some of the great points made by Huibert Verhoeven (shown above), GM/SVP of Synaptics’ IoT Division in his talk at the recent SOI Symposium in Silicon Valley.

BTW, if you missed part 1 of our coverage —Silicon Valley SOI Symposium a Huge Success. Key Takeaways (Part 1) Here. – you’ll want to be sure to read it, too. Almost all of the presentations are now posted on our website – click here to access them.

In this post here, we’ll cover presentations by Synaptics, GlobalFoundries, STMicroelectronics, Anokiwave and Dolphin Integration. It was a really full, day, so be sure to stay turned for Part 3 of our coverage to follow shortly: it will highlight the remaining presentations and panel discussions.

Synaptics: Smart Home at the Edge

Synaptics’ Verhoeven’s presentation Revolutionizing User Experience Through Secure Neural Network Acceleration at the Edge was about Smart Home and using SOI. Synaptics is a human interface (HMI) company that’s been doing neural networks since 1986. They’ve always been on the leading edge, from their first shipment of PC touchpads to becoming a dominant force in all things HMI today: they now ship over a billion units annually.

Synaptics slides 15 & 16 from the SOI Symposium, Silicon Valley 2019.

They currently have SOI products shipping with dedicated neural networks for voice, he said. European [privacy] regulations have played a part in driving their use of SOI, as have challenges regarding power and heat. Things are getting smarter at the edge. For example, not only do users want their coffee machine to offer the usual morning espresso, Synaptics says that the next step is for your coffee machine to recognize you’re looking extra tired and ask if you might want a double?!

For them Smart Home and multi-modal applications are the primary area of interest, as well as some automotive. Although their biggest customers have resources, others need guidance. Voice is a critical component, but now you also need video and display.

Why SOI? Their HMI vision requires low power, significant computation and dedicated neural network hardware, explained Verhoeven, so FD-SOI with RF meets their needs. “22nm SOI is a Goldilocks IoT Process Node,” he proclaimed. It gets the combination of active power, unit cost and investment just right. What’s more, he said, “The IP landscape has improved dramatically. Our choice of SOI was not an accident.” Be on the lookout for more products leveraging FD-SOI over the next six months, he concluded.

At this point on SOI, they’ve got 1 TOPS products with dedicated NPU for speakers, soundbars, Wi-Fi mesh, appliances, STBs and smart displays. These products have voice and sensor real-time (RT) AI. Next up is >4 TOPS on SOI with dedicated NPU, targeting STBs and smart displays with voice, video, imaging and RT AI.

GF: World-Changing Opps

GlobalFoundries slides 6 & 7 from the SOI Symposium 2019, Silicon Valley.

“Our clients are at the forefront of changing the world,” declared Mark Granger, VP of the Automotive Product Line at GlobalFoundries. His presentation, Capturing High Growth Market Opportunities with SOI, detailed how mobility, automotive and IoT are the growth markets for SOI. So not unsurprisingly, GF’s 22nm FD-SOI technology, 22FDX, is seeing particular traction in mobile, edge, wearables and automotive.

They’ve got twice as many tape-outs this year as they did a year ago, he noted. GF’s SOI portfolio includes 22FDX®, 45RFSOI and 8SW/7SW RF SOI for 5G/mobility; 22FDX for automotive (fully qualified for automotive Grade 2, with Grade 1 on the way); and 22FDX, 130RFSOI and 8SW/7SW RF SOI for IoT.

GF has announced a stream of good news recently:

  • with Dolphin Integration they’re delivering differentiated FD-SOI Adaptive Body Bias Solutions for 5G, IoT and automotive applications;
  • they’ve crossed the billion-dollar design win threshold with 8SW RF SOI technology;
  • they’ve collaborated with Synopsys to develop the industry’s first Automotive Grade 1 IP for their 22FDX process;
  • and they worked with Rambus on the delivery of High-Speed SerDes on 22FDX® for communications and 5G applications.

You might have heard about the Dolphin Integration news, as we covered it recently here at ASN (if not, be sure to read it here). Dolphin’s IP and methodology solutions address energy efficiency challenges. Automated transistor body biasing adjustment can achieve up to 7x energy efficiency with power supply as low as 0.4V on 22FDX designs. At the Silicon Valley event, Dolphin Integration CEO Philippe Berger provided additional information in his talk, FD-SOI IP Platform for Energy-Efficient IoT SoC.

Dolphin Integration slides 5 & 6 from the SOI Symposium 2019, Silicon Valley.

In another GF-related talk, Nitin Jain, the CTO of longtime GF RF-SOI customer Anokiwave presented Unleashing the mmWave Phase Array Using SOI for 5G & Satcom. Anokiwave is a fabless semi IC company (you’ll find a good technical discussion of mmWave phase array written by their Chief Architect here). They do active antennas (aka phased array), something the military’s done for a long time, but now Anokiwave is bringing it to new markets and applications including radar, satcom and 5G. What they’ve been able to do is planarize the active antennas. They use GF’s 45RFSOI process technology for phased array systems because of the cost, performance, scalability and system enhancements it enables. 45RFSOI, he explained, is ideal for beam-forming FEMs (including the switches, LNAs and PAs). The move to 5G/mmWave is going to require a lot of antennas, so these Anokiwave ICs are headed to high volumes, concluded Jain.

Stellar by ST

As Roger Forchhammer, Director of Business Development at STMicroelectronics pointed out in his presentation, Automotive FD-SOI Microcontrollers with Embedded PCM, ST pioneered FD-SOI (and that was almost a decade ago, btw). Then in February 2019, they announced a world first: they’d begun sampling 28nm FD-SOI microcontrollers (MCUs) with embedded non-volatile memory (eNVM) based on embedded Phase-Change Memory (ePCM) to 10 alpha customers. These MCUs target powertrain systems, advanced and secure gateways, safety/ADAS applications, and vehicle electrification.

STMicroelectronics slides 9 & 10 from the SOI Symposium 2019, Silicon Valley.

(In case you want technical details, the breakthrough ePCM eNVM was first presented at IEDM in December 2018 – you can get the presentation that accompanied the paper, Truly Innovative 28nm FDSOI Technology for Automotive Microcontroller Applications embedding 16MB Phase Change Memory, from the ST website.)

In his Silicon Valley presentation, Forchhammer said they’re now doing Stellar, a whole family of automotive products on FD-SOI. To do it, they’d taken an existing device and moved it to 28nm FD-SOI with ePCM, which they manufacture at their fab in Crolles, France. A major advantage for automotive he cites is that in software updates it’s bit-level programmable. “ST is fully behind FD-SOI,” he concluded, adding that we’re see more automotive as well as IoT products coming soon.

Well folks, that’s all for this post. We’ll finish up our coverage of the SOI Consortium’s 2019 Silicon Valley Symposium in the next ASN post (there was so much to cover!). So please stay tuned.

Silicon Valley SOI Symposium a Huge Success. Key Takeaways (Part 1) Here.

Takeaway #1: As NXP VP Ron Martino noted in his opening keynote at the recent SOI Symposium in San Jose, FD-SOI is the technology platform for enabling edge computing, and ultra-low power is the sweet spot. 

Organized by the SOI Consortium with support from our members, the recent SOI Symposium in Silicon Valley was an enormous success. Close to 300 decision makers signed up – more than double what we saw just a couple years ago. Attendees spanned the ecosystem: from end-users to design to foundries and right up to the investment community. The presentations and panel discussions were absolutely terrific, and almost all are now freely available – click here to get them.

The focus was heavily on FD-SOI this time, but some very interesting RF-SOI talks were given as well. This was a day packed with presentations by players from across the SOI ecosystem. In this post, we’ll only cover a few. But the others will follow quickly, so watch this page. And now without further ado, let’s dive in.

NXP: In the Sweet Spot

NXP VP Ron Martino presenting at the 2019 SOI Symposium in San Jose.

NXP is designing FD-SOI into many new products, said Martino, GM of the i.MX Processor Application Product Line. There’s a new wave of products – generically you could call them IoT but in fact they’re found throughout the industry. It’s about interacting with the cloud, so edge processing is critical. His presentation, Embedded Processors for Future Applications, is now freely available for downloading from our website.

The new i.MX7ULP is a great example of ULP in the sweet spot. From a design standpoint, it leverages IP, power optimization, and what he described as “starter biasing”. That gets them the long battery life with 2D & 3D graphics they need for wearables and portables in consumer and industrial applications.

NXP slide 10, SOI Symposium, San Jose ’19 (Courtesy: NXP)

Having deepened their expertise in biasing, NXP has now moved on to “advanced biasing” for the next generation of products. For example, the i.MX RT ULP (real-time, ultra-low-power) series are “cross-over” processors, which Martino says are the “new normal”. They deal with a high number of sensor inputs. The i.MX RT 1100 MCUs, which have been qualified for automotive and industrial applications, are breaking the gigahertz performance barrier with a low-power, 28nm FD-SOI process.

Another new product leveraging advanced biasing is the i.MX RT 600. They’ve done hardware acceleration on specific functions and optimized around visionand voice integration at low cost and power.

As shown at Embedded World ’19, automotive app for NXP’x i.MX 8, which is on 28nm FD-SOI. (Courtesy: NXP)

Likewise for the i.MX 8 and 8X subsystems for automotive and industrial applications. At Embedded World, they showed it driving advanced OLED screens, cameras (for parking, for example), V2X, audio, user monitoring (like driver pupil tracking), and integration into the windshield in a heads-up system. This is the high end of the capability of 28nm FD-SOI, he said. It’s a 6 CPU core system with multiple operating systems, about which he said: “It’s the dashboard…it’s amazing.”

BTW, in another presentation, CoreAVI, which builds avionics, automotive and industrial products on NXP’s i.MX 8, addressed safety. You can get that here.

FD-SOI enables a scalable solution for real-time and general compute with the lowest leakage memory, the best dynamic and static power, Martino concluded. NXP’s leadership in body biasing is enabling edge compute, and we can expect to see more content coming soon.

In another NXP presentation later in the day, Stefano Pietri, Technical Director of the company’s Microcontrollers Analog Design Team caught a lot of people’s attention. A wave of cameras went up to capture each of his slides in Analog Techniques for Low Power, High Performance MPU in FD-SOI – but you can get the whole thing now from our website. It’s a very technical presentation, in which he details the many ways FD-SOI makes the analog team’s job easier, enabling them to get performance not available from bulk technologies. They developed a lot of in-house expertise and IP (see slide 16 for a catalog of the IP).

Samsung: Enabling LP Endpoint Products

Tim Dry, Samsung Foundry Director of Edge & Endpoint, SOI Symposium, San Jose ’19

Tim Dry, Director of Foundry Marketing: Edge and End Point presented Samsung’s FDS with MRAM: Enabling Today’s Innovative Low Power Endpoint Products. In a telling first, Samsung has made this presentation available on our website.

FD-SOI covers the wide range of requirements for intelligent IoT, he explained: from high to low processing loads; and active to dormant processing duty cycles. That includes chips that will last for ten years, and need to be able to wake up fast and kick right into high performance. These products are 50% analog, and packaging is part of the solution (especially for the RF component).

Samsung has been shipping 28nm FD-SOI (which they call 28FDS) since 2015, first in IoT/wearables, then in automotive/industrial and consumer. Yields are fully mature. In March 2019, they announced mass production of eMRAM on 28FDS. It’s a BEOL process, adding only 3 masks. It cuts chip-level power by 65% and RF power by 76% over 40nm bulk with external memory. Beyond the fact that it’s 1000x faster than eFlash, eMRAM also has other advantages that make it especially good for over-the-air updates, for example.

Samsung Foundry FD-SOI IP slide, SOI Symposium, San Jose ’19 (Source: Samsung Foundry Keynote at SOI Symposium 2019, USA)

Samsung also has RF and 5G mmWave products shipping in 28FDS. The company has a fantastic ecosystem of partners helping here, said Dry. In AI at the endpoint, they’re shipping IoT products for video surveillance cameras: some are high speed, but some are also low speed – it depends on the detection use case. And most importantly for the design ecosystem, the IP is all ready.

Next up for Samsung is 18FDS, which will ship this year with RF, then in 2020 with eMRAM. 18FDS, Dry said, is optimized for power reduction. Compared to 28FDS, it’s got 55% lower power consumption, 25% less area and 17% better performance at the same power. You’ll hear more about it as well as their design services if you’re at the Samsung Foundry Forum in May (registration info here).

ARM’s Biased Views

Kelvin Low, VP of Marketing for Arm’s Physical Design Group (PDG) gave a presentation entitled Biased Views on the Industry’s Broadest FDSOI Physical IP Solution. By way of background, Arm and Samsung Foundry recently announced a comprehensive, foundry-sponsored physical IP platform, including an eMRAM compiler for 18FDS. In case you missed it, at the time Arm Senior Product Marketing Manager Umang Doshi described the offering in an Arm Community / Developer physical IP blog, which Arm graciously agreed to share with ASN readers.

Slide 9 from Arm’s presentation, Silicon Valley SOI Symposium 2019.

At the SOI Symposium, Low emphasized to the audience that Arm now has the broadest range of FD-SOI + IP solutions. It addresses mobile, consumer, IoT, automotive and AI/ML.

There are 18FDS POP (processor optimized pipe) packages for Arm Cortex-A55, Cortex-R52 and Cortex-M33 processors. IP integrates biasing and a number of standard PVTs (corners). And since the Samsung platform is foundry-sponsored, it’s free.

Slides 6 and 11 from Arm’s presentation, Silicon Valley SOI Symposium 2019. The goal of POP IP is to enable partners to implement and tapeout Arm cores with the fastest turn-around time and best-in-class PPA while maximizing the benefits of process technology.

Arm did a test chip with eMRAM, which they’ve just gotten back. It’s functional (some details are available in slide 14 of their presentation), and the company is now preparing a demo board that they’ll be showing shortly. Watch this page!

That’s all for this post. The next post — part 2, covering presentations by Synaptics, GlobalFoundries, STMicroelectronics, Dolphin Integration and Anokiwave — is now available. Click here to read on.

EuroSOI-ULIS (April 2019, Grenoble) + Free FD-SOI RF Technology Workshop for 5G

If you’ve never been, you should put it on your list. EuroSOI is one of those seminal conferences where you get a front-row seat to emerging technologies. It provides an interactive forum for scientists and engineers working in the field of new materials and advanced nanoscale devices. In fact, some of the leading technologies enabled by SOI that are now in the mainstream got their start at this conference. Within a few years of being presented here, the best work continues to evolve and star in the “big” conferences like IEDM and VLSI.

The list of luminaries on the steering and technical committees is a veritable who’s who of the SOI research ecosystem, including two winners of the IEEE Andrew Grove Award: Technical Chair Jean-Pierre Colinge and Sorin Cristoloveanu. So, if you want to get in on the ground floor of next-gen SOI, or just get a look at the early stages of the pipeline, this is a great place to do it.

One of the key objectives is to promote collaboration and partnership between players in academia, research and industry. As such it provides opportunities for cross-fertilization across materials, devices and design. The networking is excellent, and the gala dinner is always an affair to remember.

This year, papers in the following areas have been solicited:

  • Advanced SOI materials and wafers. Physical mechanisms and innovative SOI-like devices
  • New channel materials for CMOS: strained Si, strained SOI, SiGe, GeOI, III-V and high mobility materials on insulator; carbon nanotubes; graphene and other two-dimensional materials.
  • Properties of ultra-thin films and buried oxides, defects, interface quality. Thin gate dielectrics: high-κ materials for switches and memory.
  • Nanometer scale devices: technology, characterization techniques and evaluation metrics for high performance, low power, low standby power, high frequency and memory applications.
  • Alternative transistor architectures including FDSOI, DGSOI, FinFET, MuGFET, vertical MOSFET, Nanowires, FeFET and Tunnel FET, MEMS/NEMS, Beyond-CMOS nanoelectronic devices.
  • New functionalities in silicon-compatible nanostructures and innovative devices representing the More than Moore domain, nanoelectronic sensors, biosensor devices, energy harvesting devices, RF devices, imagers, etc.
  • CMOS scaling perspectives; device/circuit level performance evaluation; switches and memory scaling. Three-dimensional integration of devices and circuits, heterogeneous integration.
  • Transport phenomena, compact modeling, device simulation, front- and back-end process simulation.
  • Advanced test structures and characterization techniques, parameter extraction, reliability and variability assessment techniques for new materials and novel devices.
  • Emerging memory devices.

Accepted papers appear in the conference proceedings in the IEEE Xplore® digital library. The authors of the best papers are invited to submit a longer version for publication in a special issue of Solid-State Electronics. A best paper award will be attributed to the best paper by the SiNANO institute.

EuroSOI-ULIS kicks off a full week of activities in Grenoble. The day after the conference, Incize and Soitec are sponsoring an excellent, free workshop on FD-SOI RF technologies for 5G: materials, devices, circuits and performance. The’ve got a terrific line-up of presentations planned.

And towards the end of the week, there are other important satellite events. The 1st open IRDS International Roadmap for Devices and Systems European Conference (April 4th, 2019) is jointly organized by the USA, Japan and EU, and sponsored by the IEEE and SiNANO Institute. Then the week finishes out with the IEEE ICRC International Conference on Rebooting Computing (April 5th, 2019).

Grenoble the first week of April 2019 is clearly the place to be.

4G/5G Opps for SOI Supply Chain – Workshop Presentations Now Posted

The presentations from the SOI Consortium sponsored workshop held during Semicon West are now posted and freely available on the website – click here to see the full agenda with links to the presentations. The workshop, entitled 4G/5G Connectivity: Opportunities for the SOI Supply Chain, was well-attended and generated excellent discussions.

If you don’t have time to look at all of the ppts, here are quick overviews.

Market Overview and FD SOI Opportunities, by Handel Jones, CEO, IBS.

Handel Jones is an industry veteran, China expert and longtime follower of the SOI ecosystem. High performance with low power consumption are the key requirements for the continued growth in the semiconductor industry, he said, making FD-SOI the right choice for a wide range of products. Here’s how he sees it:

(Courtesy: IBS and SOI Consortium)

He estimates the yearly TAM (total available market) for FD-SOI based products in the range of $46 billion over the next 10 years, largely driven by needs for ultra-low power and RF integration. He goes on to break out volumes by applications (including ISPs – image signal processors; and CIS – CMOS image sensors), foundry markets by feature dimension and to map out technology trends.

Mobile Radio Transformation in the Age of 5G: A Perspective on Opportunities for SOI, Peter Rabbeni, Vice President, Globalfoundries.

Peter Rabbeni is an RF expert par excellence, having overseen the shipping of over 35 billion RF-SOI products to date. In his presentation, he details how 5G NR (New Radio) sub-6GHz frequency band specifications significantly increase frequency range and channel bandwidth, and how new band support and MIMO complexity and die size per handset are driving complexity in RF FEMs. Furthermore, 5G/mmWave phased arrays are driving a paradigm shift in the approaches that can be taken, he explains, so greater integration is needed. Here’s a great slide showing where GF’s two main SOI technologies come into play:

(Courtesy: GlobalFoundries and SOI Consortium)

Empowerment of 5G with SOI-Based Technologies, Emmanuel Sabonnadière, CEO, Leti-CEA.

(Courtesy: Leti and SOI Consortium)

Working in partnership with industry leaders around the world, Leti has been the research powerhouse behind all things SOI since the early 1980s. In fact Reuters ranks them #2 in their most recent list of the World’s Most Innovative Research Institutions. This presentation reviews the key technical benefits of FD-SOI for IoT and IMT (that’s international mobile communications, btw).

Engineered Substrates – at the Foundation of 5G, Thomas Piliszczuk, Executive Vice President, Soitec.

This presentation really puts the context around engineered substrates. Here are two excellent and useful slides here that identify which engineered substrates go where in the 5G world, and the engineered substrates that Soitec provides. Check these out:

(Courtesy: Soitec and SOI Consortium)

(Courtesy: Soitec and SOI Consortium)

Ultra-thin Double Layer Metrology with High Lateral Resolution, Bernd Srocka, Vice President, Unity GmbH.

(Courtesy: Unity and SOI Consortium)

In case you’re not familiar with them, Unity provides a wide range of solutions in metrology and inspection. Both the top silicon layer and BOX layer of wafers for FD-SOI applications have draconian requirements that have required new approaches in metrology to ensure the thickness and homegeneity control of these very thin layers.

China 5G Plan and SOI Ecosystem, Jeffrey Wang, CEO, Simgui.

Shanghai-based Simgui partners with Soitec, using SmartCut™ technology for the production of RF-SOI wafers. It is doubling its capacity to reach 400K over the next year, and expanding into 300mm. China is aggressively working on 5G and plans to deploy 5G commercialization in 2020. Jeff Wang’s is a terrific presentation detailing the rollout. (BTW, in addition to the massive funding effort underway, the government created the National Silicon Industry Group (NSIG) to support the semiconductor material ecosystem in China. You’ll want to keep up with what’s going on here). Here’s the slide that summarizes the SOI ecosystem in China – the presentation then goes on to detail who does what.

(Courtesy: Simgui and SOI Consortium)

Inspection and Metrology Relevance in SOI Manufacturing, Jijen Vazhaeparambil, Vice President & General Manager, KLA-Tencor.

(Courtesy: KLA-Tencor and SOI Consortium)

K-T has played a strategic role in the SOI story going back for decades (and in fact they wrote a piece for the third edition of ASN back in 2005!), ensuring metrology innovations for things that hadn’t previously need detection and measurement. With each new set of requirements, they rose to the occasion with wafer metrology solutions that helped increase quality and decrease costs. This presentation recaps some of them.

 

Chengdu Conference Indicates FD-SOI Will Play Major Role in China/Automotive

FD-SOI was a very important topic during the recent Mount Qingcheng China IC Ecosystem Forum. To situate things, Mount Qingcheng, with its lush hills and waterways, is located just outside of Chengdu. That of course is where GlobalFoundries is building its new fab, which will be the first in China to run FD-SOI. Chengdu is also a key city in China’s automotive electronics landscape.

(Image Courtesy: VeriSilicon)

The theme of the forum was Building a Smart Automotive Electronics Industry Chain. Over 260 decision-makers from government, academia and industry attended – and the SOI Consortium had a significant presence. The event was chaired by Wayne Dai, CEO/Founder of consortium member VeriSilicon, and tireless champion of the the FD-SOI ecosystem in China and worldwide. Morning keynotes were given by: Carlos Mazure, Soitec CTO and SOI Consortium Executive Co-Director; Mark Granger, GF’s VP of Automotive Product Line Management; and Tony King-Smith, Executive Advisor at AImotive, a GF 22FDX customer.

BTW, transcripts of all the talks are available through Gasgoo, China’s largest automotive B2B marketplace. You can click here to access them. (They’re in Chinese – but you can open them in the language of your choice using the major translation websites.)

Chengdu Officials Affirm Support for FD-SOI

Fan Yi, Deputy Mayor of Chengdu, spoke extensively of FD-SOI in his keynote on the importance of rapidly developing smart cars.

He heralded the “spectacular” new GlobalFoundries fab there. Following a meeting with the company’s top brass the day before, he affirmed GF’s confidence in their investment. There is a solid roadmap for FD-SOI, he noted, and efforts are underway to accelerate the move into production and expand education and training. He cited the benefits of FD-SOI for the entire supply chain, from design through package and test, raising the level of the entire IC industry to new heights. The government, he said, attaches great importance to this enterprise. Their thinking regarding intelligent transport in China is integrated with the overall approach to smart cities.

SOI Consortium Leads Industry Keynotes

Wayne Dai, VeriSilicon Founder and CEO (Photo courtesy VeriSilicon)

In his opening remarks, Wayne Dai emphasized the need for China to seize the advantage in the next round of development opportunities in the automotive electronics industry. This year’s Qingcheng forum, he noted, brought together key representatives from across the supply chain, from of the highest to the deepest reaches of the smart car electronics industry, and across markets, technologies, solutions, industrial ecosystem, standards and regulations.

In his talk on how FD-SOI is boosting the accelerated development of automotive electronics, Carlos Mazure presented the SOI Industry Consortium. He noted that the Consortium promotes mutual understanding and development across the ecosystem. SOI is already present throughout automotive applications, he noted. There are currently about 100mm2 of SOI per car, in such diverse areas power systems, transmissions, entertainment, in-vehicle networking and more. SOI will experience especially high growth in electrification, information/entertainment, networking, 5G, AI/edge computing and ADAS. He then went on to give some history and an extensive overview of the major trends and highlights we’ve seen over recent years. He finished by giving examples of convergence across the supply chain with IC manufacturers working with automakers to lower power, increase processor performance and advance 5G.

Carlos Mazure, Soitec CTO and SOI Consortium Executive Co-Director; Tony King-Smith, Executive Advisor at AImotive and Mark Granger, GF’s VP of Automotive Product Line Management (Photo courtesy VeriSilicon)

GF’s Mark Granger addressed the rapid development of automotive electronics. In certain areas, he said, he sees growth rates of over 20%. They are working on building the Chengdu ecosystem, especially for design, and in cooperation with the rest of the supply chain. Furthermore, he reminded the audience, when you talk about cars, travel implies that you also talk about IoT as well as things like infotainment and integrated radar ICs. In addition to cost and power efficiencies, the AEC-Q100 standard for IC reliability in automotive applications is also pushing designers to turn to FD-SOI. In the GF meeting with Chengdu government officials (referenced above in deputy mayor Fan Yi’s talk), he too confirmed their support of FD-SOI as a key technology for China. GF is currently cooperating with about 75 automotive partners, he said, and the company is looking to increase cooperation with partners in the Chengdu region.

Tony King-Smith talked about the 22FDX test chip AImotive is doing with Verisilicon and GF. In case you missed it, in June 2017 AImotive announced its AI-optimized hardware IP was available to global chip manufacturers for license. AiWare is built from the ground up for running neural networks, and the company says it is up to 20 times more power efficient than other leading AI acceleration hardware solutions on the market. In the same announcement, they revealed that VeriSilicon would be the first to integrate aiWare into a chip design,and that aiWare-based test chips would be fabricated on GF’s 22FDX. The chip is expected to debut this year.

While the afternoon agenda was not specific to FD-SOI, it did focus on the “smart cockpit” and “intelligent driving”, with talks by nine leading players in China’s automotive IC and investment communities.

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Note: Many thanks to the folks at VeriSilicon, who wrote up this event for their WeChat feed, and shared photos with us here at ASN.