Tag Archive sSOI

The IEEE S3S Conference Delivered Impressive Technical Content

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BayMonterey

A view of the Bay from Cannery row, Monterey, CA.

The new IEEE S3S conference promised rich content, as it merged both The IEEE International SOI Conference and the IEEE Subthreshold Microelectronics Conference, completed by an additional track on 3D Integration.

The result was an excellent conference, with outstanding presentations from key players in each of the three topics covered. This quality was reflected in the increased attendance: almost 50% more than at the SOI conference last year.

The new triptych at the heart of the conference was well illustrated by the plenary session, which combined a presentation on ST’s FD-SOI technology by Laurent LePailleur (STMicroelectronics), one on Low Power Design, by Bob Bordersen (UC Berkeley), and one on monolithic integration by Zvi Or-Bach (MonolithIC 3D™).

Professor Bordersen’s presentation dealt with power efficiency, explaining how developing dedicated units with a high level of parallelism and a low frequency can boost the number of operations performed for 1nJ of expanded power. He illustrated his point by showing how an 802.11a Dedicated Design for Computational Photography can reach 50,000 OP/nJ while an advanced quadcore microprocessor will not even reach 1 OP/nJ. Such is the price of flexibility….but the speaker claims this can be overcome by using reconfigurable interconnects.

IBM_GF_SOIFinFET

Chart from A. Paul (GF) showing benefits of Fin width scaling

The “Best SOI Paper” award went to a GlobalFoundries/IBM paper entitled “FinWidth Scaling for Improved Short Channel Control and Performance in Aggressively Scaled Channel Length SOI FinFETs.” The presenter, Abhijeet Paul (GF) explained how narrower Fins can be used to improve short channel effects while actually giving more effective current without degrading the on-resistance. (See the DIBL and SS improvement on the chart.)

 

 

The”Best SOI Student Paper” award went to H. Niebojewski for a detailed theoretical investigation of the technical requirements enabling introduction of self-aligned contacts at the 10nm node without additional circuit delay. This work by ST, CEA-Leti and IEMN was presented during the extensive session on planar FD-SOI that started with Laurent Grenouillet’s (CEA-Leti) invited talk. Laurent first updated us on 14nm FD-SOI performance: Impressive static performance has been reported at 0.9V as well as ROs running at 11.5ps/stage at the very low IOFF=5nA/µm (0.9V & FO3). Then he presented potential boosters to reach the 10nm node targets (+20% speed or -25% power @ same speed). Those boosters include BOX thinning, possibly combined with dual STI integration, to improve electrostatics and take full advantage of back-biasing as well as strain introduction in the N channel (in-plane stressors or sSOI) combined with P-channel germanidation.

sSOI (strained SOI) was also the topic of Ali Khakifirooz’ (IBM) late news paper, who showed how this material enables more than 20% drive current enhancement in FinFETs scaled at a gate pitch of 64nm (at this pitch, conventional stressors usually become mostly inefficient).

An impressive hot topics session was dedicated to RF CMOS.

J. Young (Skyworks) explained the power management challenges as data rates increase (5x/3 years). Peak power to average power ratio has moved from 2:1 to 7:1 while going from 3G to LTE. Advanced power management techniques such as Envelope Tracking can be used to boost your system’s efficiency from 31% to 41% when transferring data (compared to Average Power Tracking techniques), thus saving battery life.

Paul Hurwitz (TowerJazz) showed how SOI has become the dominant RF switch technology, and is still on the rise, with predictions of close to 70% of market share in 2014.

The conference also had a strong educational track this year, with 2 short courses (SOI and 3DI) and 2 fundamentals classes (SOI and Sub-Vt).

The SOI short course was actually not SOI-restricted, since it was addressing the challenges of designing for a new device technology. P. Flatresse (ST) and T. Bednar (IBM) covered the SOI technology parts (FD-SOI and SOI FinFETs for ASICs respectively), while D. Somasekhar (Intel) gave concrete examples of how the change of N/P performance balance, the improvement of gate control or the introduction of Mandrels has affected design. Other aspects were also covered: Design for Manufacturing (PDF), IP librairies (ARM) and design tools (Cadence) for the 14nm node, to make this short course very comprehensive.

The rump session hosted a friendly discussion about expectations for the 7nm node. It was argued that future scaling could come from 3DI, either through the use of monolithic 3D integration or stacking and TSVs because traditional scaling is facing too many challenges. Of course, 3DI may not yet be economically viable for most applications, and since it is compatible with traditional scaling, we might well see both developed in parallel.

IBM3DI_S3S13ConfShortCourse

Snapshot from Dr M. Farooq’s (IBM) presentation (3DI shortcourse)

3D integration was also the topic of another joint hot topics session covering various fields of investigation, like co-integration of InGaAs and Ge devices (AIST), or 3D cache architectures (CEA-Leti & List). A nice example was given by P. Batra (IBM) of two stacked eDRAM cache cores, where the 16Mb cache on one layer is controlled by the BIST on the other layer and vice-versa with the same efficiency as in the 2D operation.

 

The first edition of this new conference was very successful, with a good attendance, two sessions running in parallel, extensive educational tracks, a large poster session and a lot of very high quality content. The two hot topics sessions generated a lot of enthusiasm in the audience.

Similar sessions will be repeated at the conference’s next edition, in the San Francisco area. It promises to offer outstanding content once more, and we already urge you to plan to submit papers and attend it.

Leti: Adding Strain to FD-SOI for 20nm and Beyond

Work at Leti shows that strain is an effective booster for high-performance at future nodes.

The outstanding electrostatic performance already reported for planar FD-SOI technology can be improved by the use of ION boosters in order to target-high performance applications, as already demonstrated in the past.

Stressor options for FD-SOI technology

Figure 1: Stressor options for FD-SOI technology

As illustrated in Figure 1, strain can be incorporated at various places in the transistor:

  • In the channel through the use of c-SiGe for PMOS devices and strained SOI (sSOI) material for NMOS.
  • In the source and drain region with the use of SiGe or SiC for P and NMOS respectively.
  • In the Middle-of-Line process with the deposition of tensile or compressive Contact Etch Stop Layers (t- or c-CESL).

First, it is worth noting that local stressors are often more effective on FD-SOI than on bulk at a given geometry because of the mechanical properties of the buried SiO2, which is less stiff than Si[1].

We have assessed different boosters on the FD-SOI architecture. The results are summarized in Figure 2.

For NMOS, one can see that sSOI is the more promising stressor with an ION improvement of 20-35 % for wide devices; and, it can increase up to 50 % for W = 50 nm narrow transistors[2] [1]. Our preliminary results let us predict a better scalability for sSOI than for t-CESL or SMT. Moreover, the compatibility of sSOI was already proved (even if the ION-boosts are not always totally additive) with t-CESL[3] for NMOS and with rotated substrates[2], e-SiGe[4], SiGe channels[5] and (110) substrates[6] for pMOS.

For pMOSFETs, there are several options to enhance the ION, the simpler being the 45° rotated substrates with a 8 % boost[1] and r-SiGe with a 18 % improvement by an access resistance reduction (37 % if a strain can also be generated into the channel)[4]. Once again, the scalability of the global boosters is certainly better than for the local ones (c-CESL and e-SiGe).

Efficiency of stressor techniques for N & PMOS

Figure 2: Efficiency of stressor techniques for N & PMOS

 

In conclusion, thanks to all the experiments already run, we are confident in the fact that strain can be incorporated in the planar FDSOI architecture, thus boosting performance even further at 20 nm and beyond.

NOTE: This article was adapted from the Leti presentation, “FD-SOI strain options for 20 nm and below”, given at the SOI Consortium’s 6th FD-SOI Workshop. The complete presentation is available at www.soiconsortium.org.

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References:

[1] C. Fenouillet-Beranger, L. Pham Nguyen, P. Perreau, S. Denorme, F. Andrieu, O. Faynot, L. Tosti, L. Brevard, C. Buj, O.Weber, C. Gallon, V. Fiori, F. Boeuf, S. Cristoloveanu,

T. Skotnicki, “Ultra compact FDSOI transistors (including Strain and orientation) processing and performance”, ECS Transaction, 2009.

[2] S. Baudot, F. Andrieu, O. Faynot, J. Eymery, “Electrical and diffraction characterization of short and narrow MOSFETs on Fully Depleted strained Silicon-On-Insulator

(sSOI)”, Solid State Electronics, 2010.

[3] F. Andrieu, C. Fenouillet-Beranger, O. Weber, S. Baudot, C. Buj, J.-P. Noel, O. Thomas, O. Rozeau, P. Perreau, L. Tosti, L. Brevard, O. Faynot, “Ultrathin Body and BOX SOI

and sSOI for Low Power Application at the 22 nm technology node and below”, invited talk at SSDM, 2009.

[4] S. Baudot, F. Andrieu, O. Weber, P. Perreau, J.F. Damlencourt, S. Barnola, T. Salvetat, L. Tosti, L. Brévard, D. Lafond, J. Eymery, O. Faynot, “Fully-Depleted Strained Silicon-

On-Insulator p-MOSFETs with Recessed and Embedded Silicon-Germanium Source/Drain”, 2010.

[5] F. Andrieu, T. Ernst, O. Faynot, Y. Bogumilowicz, J.-M. Hartmann, J. Eymery, D. Lafond, Y.-M. Levaillant, C. Dupré, R. Powers, F. Fournel, C. Fenouillet-Beranger,

A. Vandooren, B. Ghyselen, C. Mazure, N. Kernevez, G. Ghibaudo and S. Deleonibus, “Co-integrated dual strained channel on fully depleted sSDOI CMOSFETs with

HfO2 /TiN gate stack down to 15 nm gate length”, IEEE SOI Conference, p. 223-5, 2005.

[6] T. Mizuno, N. Sugiyama, T. Tezuka, Y. Moriyama, S. Nakaharai, S. Takagi, ”(110)-Surface Strained-SOI CMOS Devices”, IEEE Transaction of Electron Devices, 52, 3, p.367, 2005.